Etymology
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bottom line (n.)

"final result, central or salient point," 1832, a figurative use from profit-and-loss accounting, where the final figure calculated is the bottom line on the page. Also (especially as an adjective) bottom-line, bottomline.

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jughandle (n.)

also jug-handle, "handle of a jug," 1816, from jug (n.) + handle (n.). As a figure of this shape, from 1846. Sense of "tight curved road used for turns" is from 1957.

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Thoth 

ancient Egyptian god of wisdom and magic, hieroglyphics, and the reckoning of time, from Latin, from Greek Thoth, from Egyptian Tehuti. Usually represented as a human figure with the head of an ibis. By the Greeks, assimilated to their Hermes.

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lutz (n.)

type of skating jump, 1932, from the name Alois Lutz, "an obscure Austrian skater of the 1920s" [James R. Hines, "Historical Dictionary of Figure Skating," 2011], who is said to have first performed it in 1913. The surname is from a form of Ludwig.

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crucifix (n.)

"a cross or representation of a cross with the crucified figure of Christ upon in," early 13c., from Old French crucefix (12c., Modern French crucifix), from Latin cruci fixus "(one) fixed to the cross" (see crucify).

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allemande (n.)

name of a German dance in 3/4 time, 1775, from French Allemande, fem. of allemand "German" (see Alemanni). As a piece of music in a suite, 1680s. As a figure in country or square dancing, from 1808.

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outline (n.)

1660s, "lines by which a figure is delineated," from out- + line (v.). Literally the outer or exterior line, but used freely for the principal or distinguishing lines. Meaning "rough draft in words" is from 1759.

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contrapposto (n.)

in visual arts, "arrangement of a figure so that the action of the upper body is strongly contrasted with that of the lower," 1903, from Italian contrapposto, past participle of contrapporre, from Latin contraponere "to place opposite, to oppose to" (see contraposition).

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decagon (n.)

"plane figure having ten sides and angles," 1630s, from Modern Latin decagonum, from Greek dekagonon, from deka "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") + gōnia "corner, angle" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Decagonal.

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