Etymology
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uncorrupted (adj.)
c. 1400, of organic matter, "not putrefied," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of corrupt (v.). From 1560s of persons, "not influenced by bribes."
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intellectualize (v.)
1819 (Coleridge), "infuse with intellectual quality," from intellectual + -ize. From 1827 as "exercise the mind, reason upon a matter of intellect." Related: Intellectualized; intellectualizing.
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wind-up (n.)
1570s, "conclusion or final adjustment and settlement of some matter," from verbal phrase wind up (see wind (v.1)). Baseball pitching sense attested from 1906.
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letter-press (adj.)
in reference to matter printed from relief surfaces, 1840, from letter (n.1) "a type character" + press (n.). Earlier "text," as opposed to copper-plate illustration (1771).
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unrefined (adj.)
1590s, "not refined in manners," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of refine (v.). Meaning "not free from gross matter" is recorded from 1610s.
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biolysis (n.)
1865, "the destruction of life," later more specifically "dissolution of a living organism, resolution of a dead organism into its constituent matter" (1880s); see bio- + -lysis. Related: Biolytic.
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uninformed (adj.)
1590s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of inform. Originally in reference to some specific matter or subject; general sense of "uneducated, ignorant" is recorded from 1640s.
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mispunctuate (v.)

"punctuate (written matter) erroneously or incorrectly," by 1843, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + punctuate (v.). Related: Mispunctuated; mispunctuating; mispunctuation (1812).

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sick (n.)

"those who are sick, persons suffering from illness," Old English seoce, from the source of  sick (adj.). Colloquial sense of "vomited matter" is by 1959.

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materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

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