Etymology
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trepid (adj.)
"trembling from fear or terror," 1640s, from Latin trepidus "scared" (see trepidation). Related: Trepidly; trepidness.
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monophobia (n.)

"morbid dread of being left alone," 1879, from mono- "alone" + -phobia "irrational fear of." Related: Monophobic.

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funk (n.1)
"depression, ill-humor," perhaps from earlier sense "cowering state of fear" (1743), identified in OED as originally Oxford slang, probably from Scottish and Northern English verb funk "become afraid, shrink through fear, fail through panic," (1737), of unknown origin. Perhaps from Flemish fonck "perturbation, agitation, distress," which is possibly related to Old French funicle "wild, mad."
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Satanophobia (n.)

"excessive fear of the Devil, morbid dread of Satan," 1860 ("The Cloister and the Hearth"), from Satan + -phobia, with connective -o-.

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hypnophobia (n.)
1855, "dread of sleep; nightmare," from hypno- "sleep" -phobia "fear." Earlier in German. Related: Hypnophobic.
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terrific (adj.)
1660s, "frightening," from Latin terrificus "causing terror or fear, frightful," from terrere "fill with fear" (see terrible) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Weakened sensed of "very great, severe" (as in terrific headache) appeared 1809; inverted colloquial sense of "excellent" began 1888. Related: Terrifically.
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revere (v.)

"regard with deep respect and veneration," 1660s, from French révérer, from Latin revereri "revere, fear," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + vereri "stand in awe of, fear, respect" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for"). Reverence was the earlier form of the verb. Related: Revered; revering.

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tremble (v.)

c. 1300, "shake from fear, cold, etc.," from Old French trembler "tremble, fear" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *tremulare (source also of Italian tremolare, Spanish temblar), from Latin tremulus "trembling, shaking, quaking," from tremere "to tremble, shiver, quake," from PIE *trem- "to tremble" (source also of Greek tremein "to shiver, tremble, to quake, to fear," Lithuanian tremiu, tremti "to chase away," Old Church Slavonic treso "to shake," Gothic þramstei "grasshopper"). A native word for this was Old English bifian. Related: Trembled; trembling. The noun is recorded from c. 1600.

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hierophobia (n.)
"fear of sacred things or persons," 1816, from hiero- "holy," from Greek hieros (see ire) + -phobia. Related: Hierophobic.
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dread (v.)

late 12c., "to fear very much, be in shrinking apprehension or expectation of," a shortening of Old English adrædan, contraction of ondrædan "counsel or advise against," also "to dread, fear, be afraid," from ond-, and- "against" (the same first element in answer, from PIE root *ant-) + rædan "to advise" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count"). Cognate of Old Saxon andradon, Old High German intraten. Related: Dreaded; dreading.

As a noun from c. 1200, "great fear or apprehension; cause or object of apprehension." As a past-participle adjective (from the former strong past participle), "dreaded, frightful," c.1400; later "held in awe" (early 15c.).

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