Etymology
Advertisement
shamus (n.)

"police officer, detective," 1920, apparently first in "The Shamus," a detective story published that year by Harry J. Loose (1880-1943), a Chicago police detective and crime writer; the book was marketed as "a true tale of thiefdom and an expose of the real system in crime." The word is said to be probably from Yiddish shames, literally "sexton of a synagogue" (according to Israel Zangwill "a potent personage only next in influence to the President"), from Hebrew shamash "servant." Probably influenced by Celtic Seamus "James," as a typical name for an Irish cop.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
riddance (n.)

1530s, "a cleaning out, removal, clearance," from rid + -ance. The meaning "a deliverance from something superfluous or unwanted" is from 1590s. Good riddance, "a welcome relief from unpleasant company or an embarrassing connection" attested from 1650s. Shakespeare has gentle riddance (1590s); Middleton has fair riddance (1610s).

Related entries & more 
beldam (n.)
also beldame, "aged woman," 1570s; earlier "grandmother" (mid-15c.), from dame (q.v.) in the sense of "mother" + bel-, Middle English prefix expressing relationship (as in belfader, belsire "grandfather"), from Old French bel, belle "beautiful, fair, fine" (see belle). This "direct relationship" sense of bel is not found in French, where the prefix, however, is used to form words for in-laws.
Related entries & more 
coverage (n.)

mid-15c., "charge for a booth at a fair," from cover + -age. The Middle English word fell from use (coverage is not in Century Dictionary, 1902). It was re-coined 1912, in American English, in the insurance sense " amount of protection given by a policy." Later extended to sports, media, etc.

Related entries & more 
cricket (n.2)

open-air game played by two sides of 11 with bats, balls, and wickets, 1590s, apparently from Old French criquet "goal post, stick," perhaps from Middle Dutch/Middle Flemish cricke "stick, staff," which is perhaps from the same root as crutch. Sense of "fair play" is first recorded 1851, on the notion of "cricket as it should be played."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
donnybrook (n.)

"scene of riotous disorder, heated argument," 1852, from Donnybrook Fair, which dated to c. 1200 but which by late 18c, had become proverbial for carousing and brawling, held in County Dublin until 1855. The place name is Irish Domhnach Broc "Church of Saint Broc."

Related entries & more 
sheen (n.)

"shining, luster, brightness, splendor" 1602 (in "Hamlet" iii.2), noun use of adjective sheene "beautiful, bright," from Old English scene, sciene "beautiful; bright, brilliant," from Proto-Germanic *skauniz "conspicuous" (source also of Old Frisian skene, Middle Dutch scone, Dutch schoon, Old High German skoni, German schön "fair, beautiful;" Gothic skaunjai "beautiful"), from PIE root *keu- "to see, observe, perceive." It is related to show (v.), and OED calls it "virtually a verbal noun to shine."

The meaning "thin film of oil on water" is from 1970. As an adjective now only in poetic or archaic use, but in Middle English used after a woman's name, or as a noun, "fair one, beautiful woman."

Related entries & more 
serenity (n.)

mid-15c., serenite, "fair, calm, clear weather," from Old French (Modern French sérénité) and directly from Latin serenitatem (nominative serenitas) "clearness, serenity," from serenus (see serene). Of persons, "tranquility of mind or temper," by 1590s. Also formerly used as a title of honor for kings (mid-15c.), probably from the similar use of Latin serenitas, which was applied to Roman emperors and later to popes.

Related entries & more 
blue-blood (adj.)
1809 in reference to the blood that flows in the veins of the old and aristocratic families of Spain, translating Spanish sangre azul, claimed by certain families of Castile that held themselves uncontaminated by Moorish or Jewish admixture; the term probably is from the notion of the visible veins of people of fair complexion. In reference to English families by 1827. As a noun, "member of an old and aristocratic family," by 1877. See blue (adj.1) + blood (n.).
Related entries & more 
integrity (n.)
Origin and meaning of integrity

c. 1400, integrite, "innocence, blamelessness; chastity, purity," from Old French integrité and directly from Latin integritatem (nominative integritas) "soundness, wholeness, completeness," figuratively "purity, correctness, blamelessness," from integer "whole" (see integer).

The sense of "wholeness, perfect condition" is attested from mid-15c.; that of "soundness of moral principle and character; entire uprightness or fidelity, especially in regard to truth and fair dealing" is by 1540s.

Related entries & more 

Page 5