Etymology
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lisle (n.)
in reference to fabric, thread, etc., 1851, from French Lisle, earlier spelling of Lille, city in northwest France where the thread was made. The name is apparently originally l'isle "the island," referring to its location.
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poncho (n.)

type of blanket-like South American cloak or loose garment, 1717, from American Spanish poncho, from Araucanian (Chile) pontho "woolen fabric," perhaps influenced by Spanish poncho (adj.), variant of pocho "discolored, faded."

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nap (v.2)

"to furnish with a nap, raise the nap of," 1610s, from nap (n.1). Earlier in a now-obsolete sense of "shear or clip off the nap of" (a fabric), late 15c., noppen, from Middle Dutch. Related: Napped; napping.

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tricot (n.)
knitted fabric, 1859, from French tricot "knitting, knitted work," from tricoter "to knit," of uncertain origin, probably a variant of Old French estriquer "to smooth," from a Germanic source (such as Middle Low German striken "pass over lightly").
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web (n.)

Old English webb "woven fabric, woven work, tapestry," from Proto-Germanic *wabjam "fabric, web" (source also of Old Saxon webbi, Old Norse vefr, Dutch webbe, Old High German weppi, German gewebe "web"), from PIE *(h)uebh- "to weave" (see weave (v.)).

Meaning "spider's web" is first recorded early 13c. Applied to the membranes between the toes of ducks and other aquatic birds from 1570s. Internet sense is from 1992, shortened from World Wide Web (1990). Web browser, web page both also attested 1990.

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cashmere (n.)
also Cassimere, etc., "type of fine, soft woolen fabric," favored for shawls, etc., 1839, short for Cashmere wool, from the old spellings of Kashmir, the Himalayan kingdom where wool was obtained from long-haired goats. As "shawl made of cashmere wool" from 1822.
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shantung (n.)
type of coarse silk, 1882, from Shantung province, in China, where the fabric was made. The place name is "east of the mountain," from shan (mountain) + dong (east). The mountain in question is Tan Shan. West of it is Shansi, from xi "west."
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Argyle (n.)
"diamond-shaped pattern of two or more colors in fabric," said to be so called from similarity to tartans worn by Campbell clan of Argyll, Scotland. The place name is literally "land of the Gaels," with first element from Old Irish airer "country." Argyle socks is from 1935.
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darn (v.)

"to mend (fabric) by interweaving yarn or thread to fill a rent or hole," c. 1600, of unknown origin. Perhaps from French darner "mend," from darne "a piece, a slice," from Breton darn "piece, fragment, part." Alternative etymology is from obsolete dern "secret, hidden." Related: Darned; darning.

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reversible (adj.)

"capable of being reversed" in any sense of that word, 1640s, from reverse (v.) + -ible. As a noun, "garment of a textile fabric having two faces, usually unlike, either of which may be exposed," by 1863. Related: Reversable (1580s).

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