Etymology
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crusade (v.)

1732, "to engage in a crusade," from crusade (n.). The usual way to express this in Middle English seems to have been take the cross (c. 1300). Related: Crusaded; crusading.

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proport (v.)

"convey to the mind, express," late 14c., from Old French proporter (12c.), variant of porporter "convey, contain, carry" (see purport (v.)). Apparently archaic or obsolete after 17c.

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reword (v.)

c. 1600, "to repeat, put in words again," from re- "back, again" + word (v.) "put in words." The meaning "express in other words" is by 1882. Related: Reworded; rewording.

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sh (interj.)

exclamation used to urge or request silence, 1847 (hush in this sense is from c. 1600). The gesture of putting a finger to the lips to express silence is attested from Roman times. As a transitive verb from 1887; intransitive from 1925.

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embody (v.)

1540s, in reference to a soul or spirit, "invest with an animate form;" from 1660s of principles, ideas, etc., "express, arrange or exemplify intelligently or perceptibly;" from em- (1) "in" + body (n.). Related: Embodied; embodying.

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caw (v.)

"make a sound like a crow, raven, etc.," 1580s, imitative. "Similar imitative forms occur in many and diverse languages, to express the cry or as a name for the crow and other corvine birds" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Cawed; cawing.

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beachfront (adj.)
also beach-front, 1903, American English, from beach (n.) + front (n.). The beach front was a standard way in late 19c. to express "the seashore of a town" such as Atlantic City.
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mimic (adj.)

"acting as a mime, practicing imitation, consisting of or resulting from mimicry," 1590s, from Latin mimicus, from Greek mimikos "of or pertaining to mimes," verbal adjective from mimeisthai "to mimic, represent, imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)).

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mime (v.)

1610s, "to act without words," from mime (n.). The transferred sense of "to mimic, to imitate" is from 1733 (Greek mimeisthai meant "to imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation"). Meaning "to pretend to be singing a pre-recorded song to lip-sync" is by 1965. Related: mimed; miming.

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beck (n.)
late 14c., "nod or other mute signal intended to express desire or command," a noun use from Middle English bekken (v.), variant of becnan "to beckon" (see beckon). Transferred sense of "slightest indication of will" is from late 15c.
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