Etymology
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prettify (v.)

"make pretty, embellish," especially in a petty, finical way, by the excessive or fanciful use of ornamentation, 1836, from pretty (adj.) + -fy. Related: Prettified; prettifying.

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unreasonable (adj.)
mid-14c., "irrational, illogical," from un- (1) "not" + reasonable. From late 14c. as "excessive, going beyond what is sensible or realistic." Related: Unreasonably; unreasonableness.
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overcharge (v.)

c. 1300, overchargen, "to overload, overburden, load (something) too heavily," from over- + charge (v.). Meaning "to charge someone too much money, demand an excessive price from" is from 1660s. Related: Overcharged; overcharging.

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debauchery (n.)

"excessive indulgence in sensual pleasures of any kind," 1640s, from debauch + -ery. With a variety of spellings in 17c., such as debaush-, deboich-, debosh-. Debauchment in the same sense is from 1620s.

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overexposure (n.)

also over-exposure, "excessive exposure; an excess of exposure," 1834 in reference to cleavage in women's dress; 1855 in photography, from over- + exposure. Figurative sense, in reference to celebrity, is attested from 1969.  

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dissipated (adj.)

c. 1600, "scattered, wasted, frittered away," past-participle adjective from dissipate (v.). By 1744 as "characterized by extravagant, excessive, or dissolute pleasures, intemperate."

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sclerosis (n.)

"a hardening," especially "morbid hardening of the tissue," late 14c., from Medieval Latin sclerosis "a hardness, hard tumor," from Greek sklērosis "hardening," from sklēros "hard" (see sclero-). Figurative use, "excessive resistance to change," is by 1954.

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hippomania (n.)
"excessive fondness for horses" (especially in reference to the intense and passionate interest in horses developed in some girls between ages 10 and 14), 1956, from hippo- "horse" + mania.
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frauendienst (n.)
"excessive chivalry toward women," 1879 as a German word in English, from the title of a work by Ulrich von Lichtenstein (13c.), from German frauen, plural of frau "woman" + dienst "service."
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ophidiophobia (n.)
1914, "excessive fear of snakes or reptiles," from ophidio- apparently extracted from Modern Latin ophidia, a word coined arbitrarily (to provide an -ia form to serve as an order name in taxonomy) from Greek ophis "serpent" (see ophio-) + -phobia.
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