Etymology
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mise en scene 

"the entire scenery and properties of a stage play," 1830, from French mise en scène, literally "setting on the stage," from mise (13c.) "a putting, placing," noun use of fem. past participle of mettre "to put, place," from Latin mittere "to send" (see mission). Hence, figuratively, "the surroundings of an event" (1872).

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contingency (n.)
Origin and meaning of contingency

1560s, "quality of being contingent, openness to chance or free will, the possibility that that which happens might not have happened," from contingent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "a chance occurrence, an accident, an event which may or may not occur" is from 1610s.

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walk-over (n.)
"easy victory," 1838, such as one that happens in the absence of competitors, when the solitary starter, being obliged to complete the event, can traverse the course at a walk. Transferred sense of "anything accomplished with great ease" is attested from 1902. To walk (all) over (someone) "treat with contempt" is from 1851.
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countdown (n.)

also count-down, "the counting down of numerals in reverse order to zero before a significant event," also the preparations made during this time, 1953, American English, in early use especially of launches of rockets or missiles, from the verbal phrase (attested by 1954); see count (v.) + down (adv.).

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quadricentennial 

"pertaining to or consisting of a period of 400 years," as a noun, "commemoration or celebration of an event which occurred 400 years ago," also quadri-centennial, 1859, from quadri- + centennial. Alternative quater-centennial (1868, meaning "four times a year") is from Latin quater "four times" (compare quaternary).

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prevention (n.)

mid-15c., prevencioun, "action of stopping an event or practice," from Medieval Latin preventionem (nominative preventio) "action of anticipating; a going before," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praevenire "come or go before, anticipate" (see prevent). Original sense in English now is obsolete; the meaning "act of hindering or rendering impossible by previous measures" is from 1660s.

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venue (n.)
c. 1300, "a coming for the purpose of attack," from Old French venue "coming" (12c.), from fem. past participle of venir "to come," from Latin venire "to come," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." The sense of "place where a case in law is tried" is first recorded 1530s. Extended to locality in general, especially "site of a concert or sporting event" (1857). Change of venue is from Blackstone (1768).
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precursor (n.)

early 15c., precursoure, "a forerunner; that which precedes an event and indicates its approach," from Old French precurseur and directly from Latin praecursor "forerunner," agent noun from past-participle stem of praecurrere, from prae "before" (see pre-) + currere "to run" (from PIE root *kers- "to run"). Originally of John the Baptist. Related: Precursive; precursory.

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presentiment (n.)

"a direct, though vague, perception of a future event," 1714, from French presentiment (Modern French pressentiment), from pressentir "to have foreboding," from Latin praesentire "to sense or feel beforehand," from prae "before" (see pre-) + sentire "perceive, feel" (see sense (n.)). Especially a feeling that some misfortune or calamity is about to happen, a foreboding.

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indeed (adv.)

c. 1600, a contraction into one word of the prepositional phrase in dede "in fact, in truth, in reality" (early 14c.), from Old English dæd "a doing, act, action, event" (see deed (n.)). As an interjection, 1590s; as an expression of surprise or disgust, 1834. Emphatic form yes (or no) indeedy attested from 1856, American English.

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