Etymology
Advertisement
respectable (adj.)

1580s, "worthy of notice or observation" (a sense now obsolete); 1590s, "worthy of esteem by reason of inherent qualities;" see respect (v.) + -able.

Of persons, "having an honest reputation" from 1755; the sense of "moderately well-to-do and deserving respect for morality; occupying a fairly good position in society" is by 1800. From 1755 as "considerable in size or number;" from 1775 as "not too big, tolerable, fair, mediocre." Related: Respectably.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
appreciate (v.)

1650s, "to esteem or value highly," from Late Latin appretiatus, past participle of appretiare "to set a price to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + pretium "price" (see price (n.)). Meaning "to rise in value" (intransitive) is by 1787; sense of "be fully conscious of" is by 1833. "Appreciate is to set a just value on; it implies the use of wise judgment or delicate perception" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Appreciated; appreciating.

Related entries & more 
depute (v.)

mid-14c., deputen, "to appoint, assign as a substitute or agent," from Old French deputer (14c.), from Late Latin deputare "destine, allot," in classical Latin "to esteem, consider, consider as," literally "to cut off, prune," from de- "away" (see de-) + putare "to think, count, consider," literally "to cut, prune," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp." Meaning "assign to a deputy" is from early 15c. Related: Deputed; deputing.

Related entries & more 
rehabilitate (v.)

1580s, "restore to a former capacity or standing, or a former right, rank, or privilege lost or forfeited," a back-formation from rehabilitation and in part from Medieval Latin rehabilitatus, past participle of rehabilitare. Century Dictionary calls it "a term drawn from the civil and canon law."

By 1845 as "to bring back to a former condition after decay or damage." The meaning "to restore one's reputation or character in the esteem of others" is from 1847. Related: Rehabilitated; rehabilitating.

Related entries & more 
diligent (adj.)
Origin and meaning of diligent

"constant in effort to accomplish what is undertaken," mid-14c., from Old French diligent (14c.) and directly from Latin diligentem (nominative diligens) "attentive, assiduous, careful," present-participle adjective from diligere "single out, value highly, esteem, prize, love; aspire to, be content with, appreciate," originally "to pick out, select," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + legere "choose, gather," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Related: Diligently.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
derogatory (adj.)

c. 1500, "detracting or tending to lessen authority, rights, or standing by taking something away from," from Late Latin derogatorius, from Latin derogatus, past participle of derogare "to take away, detract from, diminish," also "repeal partly, restrict, modify," from de "away" (see de-) + rogare "ask, question; propose," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." In reference to honor, esteem, or reputation, 1560s. Related: Derogatorily.

Related entries & more 
penal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to punishment by law," mid-15c., from Old French peinal (12c., Modern French pénal) and directly from Medieval Latin penalis, from Latin poenalis "pertaining to punishment," from poena "punishment," from Greek poinē "blood-money, fine, penalty, punishment," from PIE *kwoina, from root *kwei- "to pay, atone, compensate" (source also of Greek timē "price, worth, honor, esteem, respect," tinein "to pay a price, punish, take vengeance;" Sanskrit cinoti "observes, notes;" Avestan kaena "punishment, vengeance;" Old Church Slavonic cena "honor, price;" Lithuanian kaina "value, price").

Related entries & more 
magnify (v.)

late 14c., magnifien, "to speak or act for the glory or honor (of someone or something)," from Old French magnefiier "glorify, magnify," from Latin magnificare "esteem greatly, extol, make much of," from magnificus "great, elevated, noble," literally "doing great deeds," from magnus "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Meaning "increase the apparent size of by use of a telescope or microscope" is from 1660s, said to be a development peculiar to English. Related: Magnified; magnifying. Magnifying glass is by 1650s.

Related entries & more 
deputy (n.)

c. 1400, "subordinate officer, one given the full power of an officer without holding the office," from Anglo-French deputé, noun use of past-participle of Old French députer "appoint, assign" (14c.), from Late Latin deputare "to destine, allot," in classical Latin "to esteem, consider, consider as," literally "to cut off, prune," from de- "away" (see de-) + putare "to think, count, consider," literally "to cut, prune," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp."

Meaning "person appointed or elected to act in the place of another or others" is from 1769.

Related entries & more 
count (n.2)
Origin and meaning of count

early 14c., "a counting, a calculation," also "an account of money or property;" late 15c., "the total number, the total counted," from Anglo-French counte, Old French conte "a count, a reckoning, calculations," from conter "to count, add up," from Latin computare "to count, sum up, reckon together" (see compute).

Meaning "estimation, esteem, consideration" is from late 15c. In law, "each charge in an indictment," from 1580s. In boxing, "the counting by the referee of the 10 seconds allowed a fallen fighter to get up again," by 1902. In baseball and softball, "the number of strikes and balls thrown to a batter in a turn at the plate," by 1909.

Related entries & more 

Page 5