Etymology
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spray-paint (n.)

"type of paint suitable for application by air-spraying," 1897, from spray (v.) + paint (v.). A spray paint-brush, and the technology of spray-painting, are described in "The Electrical Engineer" of Jan. 20, 1893. As a verb by 1928. Related: Spray-painted; spray-painting.

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grounded (adj.)

late 14c., "learned, instructed thoroughly in the basics;" 1540s as "firmly fixed or established," past-participle adjective from ground (v.). Electrical sense is from 1889. Meaning "having been denied privileges" is from 1940s. Dickens had room-ridden "confined to one's room."

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solenoid (n.)

"coil of insulated wire carrying an electrical current and having magnetic properties," 1827, from French solénoïde, from Greek sōlēnoeidēs "pipe-shaped," from sōlēn "pipe, channel" + combining form of eidos "form, shape" (see -oid). Related: Solenoidal.

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electrify (v.)

1745, "to charge with electricity, cause electricity to pass through;" see electric + -fy. Figurative sense recorded by 1752. Meaning "convert a factory, industry, etc., to electrical power" is by 1902. Related: Electrified; electrifying.

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almoner (n.)

"official distributor of alms on behalf of another," c. 1300 (mid-13c. as a surname), from Old French almosnier "alms-giver" (12c.; Modern French aumônier), from Vulgar Latin *almosinarius, from Late Latin elemosinarius (adj.) "connected with alms," from eleemosyna "alms" (see alms). OED notes, "the Renascence brought up a number of artificial spellings," and Middle English Compendium lists aumener, aum(s)ner, a(u)moner, aumerer, aumbrer, amener, ambner, aumoiner, almoiner, almer, and halner.

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disruptive (adj.)

"causing or tending to cause disruption," 1862; see disrupt + -ive. From 1840 in reference to electrical discharges (in this sense probably from French). By 1876 as "produced by disruption." Related: Disruptively; disruptiveness.

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spark (v.)

c. 1200, "to emit sparks," from spark (n.). Meaning "to affect by an electrical spark" is from 1889. Figurative meaning "stimulate, to trigger" first attested 1912. Meaning "to play the gallant, to court" is from the 17c. secondary sense of the noun. Related: Sparked; sparking.

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*bhag- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to share out, apportion; to get a share."

It forms all or part of: aphagia; Bhagavad-Gita; baksheesh; esophagus; nebbish; pagoda; -phage; phago-; -phagous; porgy; sarcophagus.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhajati "assigns, allots, apportions, enjoys, loves," bhagah "allotter, distributor, master, lord," bhaksati "eats, drinks, enjoys;" Persian bakhshidan "to give;" Greek phagein "to eat," literally "to have a share of food;" Old Church Slavonic bogatu "rich."

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route (v.)

1890, of a railroad ticket, "mark for use on a certain route," from route (n.). The meaning "direct (an electrical signal, phone call, etc.) over a particular circuit or to a particular location" is by 1948. Related: Routed; routing; routeing (1881).

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electrode (n.)

"one of the two ends of an open electrical circuit," 1834, coined by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday from electro- + Greek hodos "a way, path, track, road" (a word of uncertain origin; see Exodus) on the same pattern as anode, cathode.

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