Etymology
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nog (n.)

1690s, "old, strong type of beer brewed in Norfolk," of unknown origin; perhaps related to noggin. Also see egg-nog. Related: Noggy "tipsy, intoxicated."

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blastocyst (n.)

a fertilized egg after about 5 or 6 days, when it is a ball of rapidly dividing cells, 1876, from blasto- + cyst.

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egghead (n.)

also egg-head, 1907, "bald person," from egg (n.) + head (n.). Sense of "intellectual" is attested from 1918, among Chicago newspapermen; popularized by U.S. syndicated columnist Stewart Alsop in 1952 in reference to Adlai Stevenson's presidential campaign.

Adlai Stevenson once told what it was like to be the rare intellectual in politics. "Via ovicapitum dura est," he said, the way of the egghead is hard. [New York Times, Oct. 28, 1982]
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oolite (n.)

"limestone rock consisting of fine spherical grains of carbonate of lime," 1785, from Modern Latin oolites, from oo- "egg," + Greek lithos "stone" (see litho-). So called because the rock resembles the roe of fish. Related: Oolitic.

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beignet (n.)

"fritter," 1827, from French beignet "fritter, egg-roll, doughnut" (14c.), from Old French buigne "bump, lump," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Middle High German bunge "clod, lump"), or from Gaulish *bunia (compare Gaelic bonnach).

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moisturize (v.)

"impart moisture to, remove dryness, make slightly damp or wet," 1915 (implied in moisturizing), in reference to a commercial egg incubator, from moisture + -ize. By 1953 in reference to creams and lotions for the skin. Related: Moisturized; moisturization.

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chopper (n.)

1550s, "one who chops," agent noun from chop (v.1). Meaning "meat cleaver" is by 1818. Meaning "helicopter" is from 1951, Korean War military slang (compare egg-beater); as a type of stripped-down motorcycle (originally preferred by Hells Angels) from 1965.

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ovoviviparous (adj.)

"producing eggs which are hatched within the body of the parent, but without placental attachment," 1801, from combining form of ovum "egg" + viviparous "bringing forth young alive." It occurs in many reptiles, and some fishes, insects, worms, etc. Related: Ovoviviparity.

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roc (n.)

monstrous predatory bird of Arabian mythology, 1570s, from Arabic rukhkh, from Persian rukh. It is mentioned in Marco Polo's account of Madagascar; according to OED, modern use of the word mostly is due to translations of the "Arabian Nights" tales. Hence roc's egg "something marvelous or prodigious." Compare simurgh.

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edge (n.)

Old English ecg "corner, edge, point," also "sword" (also found in ecgplega, literally "edge play," ecghete, literally "edge hate," both used poetically for "battle"), from Proto-Germanic *agjo (source also of Old Frisian egg "edge;" Old Saxon eggia "point, edge;" Middle Dutch egghe, Dutch eg; Old Norse egg, see egg (v.); Old High German ecka, German Eck "corner"), from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce."

Spelling development of Old English -cg to Middle English -gg to Modern English -dge represents a widespread shift in pronunciation. To get the edge on (someone) is U.S. colloquial, first recorded 1911. Edge city is from Joel Garreau's 1992 book of that name. Razor's edge as a perilous narrow path translates Greek epi xyrou akmes. To be on edge "excited or irritable" is from 1872; to have (one's) teeth on edge is from late 14c., though "It is not quite clear what is the precise notion originally expressed in this phrase" [OED].

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