Etymology
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oocyst (n.)

in biology, "sac or pouch serving as a receptacle for eggs," 1875; see oo- "egg" + cyst.

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fertilize (v.)
1640s, "make fertile;" see fertile + -ize. Its biological sense of "unite with an egg cell" is first recorded 1859. Related: Fertilized; fertilizing.
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cockney (n.)

"native or permanent resident of London," specifically the City of London, more precisely one born or living "within the sound of Bow-Bell" (see Bow bells); c. 1600, usually said to be from Middle English cokenei, cokeney "spoiled child, milksop" (late 14c.), originally cokene-ey "cock's egg" (mid-14c.). The most likely disentangling of the etymology is to start from Old English cocena "cock's egg" -- genitive plural of coc "cock" + æg "egg" -- medieval term for "runt of a clutch" (as though "egg laid by a cock"), extended derisively c. 1520s to "town dweller," gradually narrowing thereafter to residents of a particular neighborhood in the East End of London. Liberman, however, disagrees:

Cockney, 'cock's egg,' a rare and seemingly obsolete word in Middle English, was, in all likelihood, not the etymon of ME cokeney 'milksop, simpleton; effeminate man; Londoner,' which is rather a reshaping of [Old French] acoquiné 'spoiled' (participle). However, this derivation poses some phonetic problems that have not been resolved.

The characteristic accent so called from 1890, but the speech peculiarities were noted from 17c. As an adjective in this sense, from 1630s. Related: Cockneydom; Cockneyish.

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Bearnaise (n.)
"egg-and-butter sauce," 1877, from French sauce béarnaise, from fem. of béarnais "of Béarn," region in southwest France (named for the Benarni, a Gaulish tribe).
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Ovaltine 

proprietary name of a drink mix, 1906, probably based on Latin ovum "egg" (see ovary), because eggs are one of the ingredients.

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nog (n.)

1690s, "old, strong type of beer brewed in Norfolk," of unknown origin; perhaps related to noggin. Also see egg-nog. Related: Noggy "tipsy, intoxicated."

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egghead (n.)

also egg-head, 1907, "bald person," from egg (n.) + head (n.). Sense of "intellectual" is attested from 1918, among Chicago newspapermen; popularized by U.S. syndicated columnist Stewart Alsop in 1952 in reference to Adlai Stevenson's presidential campaign.

Adlai Stevenson once told what it was like to be the rare intellectual in politics. "Via ovicapitum dura est," he said, the way of the egghead is hard. [New York Times, Oct. 28, 1982]
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oolite (n.)

"limestone rock consisting of fine spherical grains of carbonate of lime," 1785, from Modern Latin oolites, from oo- "egg," + Greek lithos "stone" (see litho-). So called because the rock resembles the roe of fish. Related: Oolitic.

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moisturize (v.)

"impart moisture to, remove dryness, make slightly damp or wet," 1915 (implied in moisturizing), in reference to a commercial egg incubator, from moisture + -ize. By 1953 in reference to creams and lotions for the skin. Related: Moisturized; moisturization.

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ovoviviparous (adj.)

"producing eggs which are hatched within the body of the parent, but without placental attachment," 1801, from combining form of ovum "egg" + viviparous "bringing forth young alive." It occurs in many reptiles, and some fishes, insects, worms, etc. Related: Ovoviviparity.

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