Etymology
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terra (n.)
Latin, "earth," from PIE root *ters- "to dry."
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conterraneous (adj.)

"of the same earth or world," 1640s, from Latin conterraneus, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + terra "earth, land" (literally "dry land," from PIE root *ters- "to dry"). 

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terrain (n.)
1727, "ground for training horses," from French terrain "piece of earth, ground, land," from Old French (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *terranum, from Latin terrenum "land, ground," noun use of neuter of terrenus "of earth, earthly," from terra "earth, land," literally "dry land" (as opposed to "sea"); from PIE root *ters- "to dry." Meaning "tract of country, considered with regard to its natural features" first attested 1766.
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tureen (n.)
1706, from French terrine "earthen vessel," from Old French therine (15c.), noun use of fem. of terrin (adj.) "earthen," from Gallo-Roman *terrinus, from Latin terrenus "of the earth," from terra "earth" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry").
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perigee (n.)

"point at which a celestial body is nearest the Earth," 1590s, from Modern Latin perigeum (15c.), from Late Greek peregeion, used by Ptolemy as a noun, properly neuter of adjective perigeios "near the earth," from peri ges, from peri "near" (see peri-) + ges, genitive of "earth" (see Gaia). Now only of the moon, formerly used also for the corresponding point in the orbit of any celestial body. Compare apogee.

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netherworld (n.)
also nether-world, 1630s, "place beneath the earth," from nether + world.
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kobold (n.)
German earth-elemental or nature spirit, 1830; see cobalt.
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geomancy (n.)

"art of divination by means of signs derived from the earth," late 14c., from Old French géomancie, from Medieval Latin geomantia, from late Greek *geomanteia, from geo-, combining form of "earth" (see Gaia) + manteia "divination" (see -mancy). Related: Geomantic; geomantical.

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holmium (n.)

rare earth element, named by French chemist Lecoq de Boisbaudran in 1886, from holmia "holmium oxide," name of an earth identified and named in Modern Latin by the earth's discoverer, Swedish chemist Per Teodor Cleve, in 1879 from Holmia, Latin name of Stockholm. With metallic element ending -ium. Holmia was isolated from erbia, the Scandinavian earth which also yielded thulium, scandium, and ytterbium.

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spaceship (n.)
1894, from space (n.) + ship (n.). Spaceship earth is from 1966.
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