Etymology
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declamation (n.)

late 14c., declamacioun, "composition written to be declaimed," from Latin declamationem (nominative declamatio) "exercise in oratorical delivery; declamation;" in a bad sense, "loud, eager talking," noun of action from past-participle stem of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Meaning "a public harangue or speech" is from 1520s; sense of "act of making rhetorical harangues in public" is from 1550s.

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sanguinary (adj.)

1620s, "characterized by slaughter, attended by much bloodshed;" also bloodthirsty, eager to shed blood, delighting in carnage," from French sanguinaire or directly from Latin sanguinarius "of or pertaining to blood," also, rarely, "blood-thirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood," a word of unknown origin. Latin distinguished sanguis, the generic word, from cruor "blood from a wound" (related to English raw, from PIE root *kreue-). The classical sense of "pertaining to blood" is rare in English.

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scrannel (adj.)

"thin, slight, slender, eager," 1630s; any modern use traces to Milton ("Lycidas," 124), who may have invented it out of dialectal scranny, a variant of scrawny. Or it might have been an existing word from a Scandinavian source akin to Norwegian skran "rubbish." Also compare English dialectal and Scottish skran "scraps, broken victuals; refuse," in military slang "food," which is of obscure origin, hence out on the scran "begging."

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vinegar (n.)
early 14c., from Old French vinaigre "vinegar," from vin "wine" (from Latin vinum; see wine (n.)) + aigre "sour" (see eager). In Latin, it was vinum acetum "wine turned sour," acetum for short (see acetic), also used figuratively for "wit, shrewdness;" and compare Greek oxos "wine vinegar," which is related to oxys "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce"). Related: Vinegary; vinegarish.
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list (v.4)
"to be pleased, desire" (intransitive), a sense now archaic, mid-12c., lusten, listen "to please, desire," from Old English lystan "to please, cause pleasure or desire, provoke longing," from Proto-Germanic *lustjan (source also of Old Saxon lustian, Dutch lusten "to like, fancy," Old High German lusten, German lüsten, Old Norse lysta "desire, wish, have a fancy"), from *lustuz-, from PIE root *las- "to be eager, wanton, or unruly" (see lust (n.)). Related: Listed; listing.
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acrid (adj.)
1712, "sharp and bitter to the taste," formed irregularly (perhaps by influence of acrimonious) from Latin acer (fem. acris) "sharp to the senses, pungent, bitter, eager, fierce," also figuratively, of qualities, "active, ardent, spirited," also "hasty, quick, passionate;" of mind "violent, vehement; subtle, penetrating," from PIE *akri- "sharp," from root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce." Of feelings, temper, etc., in English from 1781. The -id suffix probably is in imitation of acid. Acrious (1670s) is a correct formation, but seldom seen. Related: Acridly.
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racket (n.1)

"loud, disorderly, confusing noise," 1560s, probably imitative. Klein and Century Dictionary compare Gaelic racaid "noise, disturbance," but OED says this "is no doubt from Eng."

Meaning "dishonest activity" (1785) is perhaps an extended sense, from the notion of "something going on" or "noise or disturbance made to distract a pick-pocket's victim." Or it might be from racquet, via the notion of "a game," or from or reinforced by rack-rent "extortionate rent." There also was a verb racket "carry on eager or energetic action" (1753), and the gangster sense might be via the notion of "exciting and unusual." Weakened sense of "way of life, one's line of business" is by 1891.

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current (adj.)

c. 1300, curraunt, "running, flowing, moving along" (a sense now archaic), from Old French corant "running, lively, eager, swift," present participle of corre "to run," from Latin currere "to run, move quickly" (of persons or things), from PIE root *kers- "to run." Related: Currentness.

Sense of "presently in effect" is from mid-15c. Meaning "prevalent, generally reported or known" is from 1560s; that of "established by common consent" is from 1590s; that of "now passing, present now, in progress" is from c. 1600. Of money, "passing from one person to another," late 15c. Current events is attested from 1795; current affairs by 1776.

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quarry (n.1)

[what is hunted] early 14c., quirre "entrails of deer placed on the hide and given to dogs of the chase as a reward," from Anglo-French quirreie, Old French cuiriee "the spoil, quarry" (Modern French curée), altered (by influence of Old French cuir "skin," from Latin corium "hide"), from Old French corée "viscera, entrails," from Vulgar Latin *corata "entrails," from Latin cor "heart" (from PIE root *kerd- "heart").

The original meaning is obsolete. The sense of "beast of the chase when pursued or slain in a hunt" is by 1610s, also "any object of eager pursuit;" earlier "bird targeted by a hawk or other raptor" (late 15c.).

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abandon (n.)
"a letting loose, freedom from self-restraint, surrender to natural impulses," by 1822 as a French word in English (it remained in italics or quotation marks through much of the 19c.; the naturalized abandonment in this sense was attempted from 1834), from a sense in French abandon "abandonment; permission" (12c.), from abandonner "to surrender, release" (see abandon (v.)).

The noun was borrowed earlier (c. 1400) from Old French in a sense "(someone's) control;" and compare Middle English adverbial phrase at abandon, i.e. "recklessly," attested from late 14c. In Old French, the past-participle adjective abandoné came to mean "zealous, eager, unreserved."
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