Etymology
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either 

Old English ægðer, contraction of æghwæðer (pron., adv., conj.) "each of two, both," from a "always" (see aye (adv.)) + ge- collective prefix + hwæðer "which of two, whether" (see whether). Cognate with Old Frisian eider, Dutch ieder, Old High German eogiwedar, German jeder "either, each, every").

Modern sense of "one or the other of two" is late 13c. Adverbially, for emphasis, "in any case, at all," especially when expressing negation, by 1828. Use of either-or to suggest an unavoidable choice between alternatives (1931) in some cases reflects Danish enten-eller, title of an 1843 book by Kierkegaard.

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interchange (v.)
late 14c., enterchaungen, "to give and receive reciprocally; to alternate, put each in place of the other" (trans.), also "change reciprocally" (intrans.), from Old French entrechangier "interchange, exchange," from entre- "between" (see inter-) + changier "to change" (see change (v.)). Related: Interchanged; interchanging.
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keno (n.)
game of chance (akin to bingo), 1814, American English, probably from French quine "five winning numbers in a lottery," from Latin quini "five each," distributive of quinque "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five"). The numbers are arranged in rows of five.
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taroc (n.)
1610s, name of an old card game of Italy, Austria, etc., played originally with a 78-card deck that includes four suits, four face-cards each, plus the tarot cards as trumps; from Old Italian tarocchi (plural); see tarot.
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adays (adv.)
late 14c., "by day; on or in the day or time," with adverbial genitive -s from earlier aday (mid-13c.), prepositional phrase used as an adverb, from a- (1) "on, on each" + day (n.). The genitive ending now is regarded as an accusative plural.
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occlusion (n.)

"act or fact of being stopped up," 1640s, from Medieval Latin occlusionem (nominative occlusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin occludere (see occlude). Dentistry sense "position of the two sets of teeth relative to each other when the mouth is closed" is from 1880.

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interview (n.)

1510s, "face-to-face meeting, formal conference," from French entrevue, verbal noun from s'entrevoir "to see each other, visit each other briefly, have a glimpse of," from entre- "between" (see inter-) + Old French voir "to see" (from Latin videre, from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Modern French interview is from English. Journalistic sense "conversation with someone to obtain statements for publication" is from 1869 in American English.

The 'interview,' as at present managed, is generally the joint product of some humbug of a hack politician and another humbug of a newspaper reporter. [The Nation, Jan. 28, 1869]

Meaning "personal meeting to discuss hiring or employment" is by 1921; earlier it was used in military recruiting (1918).

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divider (n.)

1520s, "one who deals out shares to each," agent noun from divide (v.). Sense of "one who or that which separates into parts" is from 1590s; specifically, "partition or screen," especially in a room, from 1959. Sense of "one who disunites or keeps apart" is from 1640s.

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correspondent (adj.)

early 15c., "having an analogous relationship (to), answering, matching," a sense taken up since 19c. by corresponding; from Medieval Latin correspondentem, present participle of correspondere "correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond).

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catchword (n.)
1730, "the first word of the following page inserted at the lower right-hand corner of each page of a book," from catch (v.) + word (n.); extended to "word caught up and repeated" (especially in the political sense) by 1795. The literal sense is extinct; the figurative sense thrives.
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