Etymology
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trivet (n.)
three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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corn-snake (n.)

popular name of a type of large but harmless rat-snake of the southeastern and central U.S., often found in cornfields, 1670s, from corn (n.1) + snake (n.).

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driftwood (n.)

"wood floating on water," 1630s, from drift (v.) + wood (n.).

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firewood (n.)
also fire-wood, late 14c., from fire (n.) + wood (n.).
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decapod (n.)

1819, "ten-legged animal, type of crustacean having ten legs" (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), from French décapode (1806), from Modern Latin Decapoda (animalia), from Greek dekapoda, neuter plural of dekapous "ten-footed" (see ten + foot (n.)). From 1885 in reference to a type of locomotive with ten driving-wheels.

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redwood (n.)

also red-wood, 1610s, "wood that has a red hue," from red (adj.1) + wood (n.). Of various types of New World trees that yield such wood, from 1716; specifically the California Sequoia sempervirens from 1819. In Scottish English 16c.-18c. the same word as an adjective meant "completely deranged, raving, stark mad," from wood (adj.).

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prawn (n.)

"long-tailed, ten-footed shrimp-like crustacean, abundant on the shores of the British Isles," early 15c., prayne, a word of unknown origin. "No similar name found in other langs." [OED].

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Rathaus (n.)

German town hall, 1610s, from German Rathaus, literally "council house," from Rat "council" (from Proto-Germanic *redaz, from suffixed form of PIE root *re- "to reason, count") + Haus "house" (see house (n.)).

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biped (n.)
"animal with two feet," 1640s, from Latin bipedem (nominative bipes) "two-footed," as a plural noun, "men;" from bi- "two" (see bi-) + pedem (nominative pes) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). As an adjective from 1781.
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wan (adj.)
Old English wann "dark, dusky, lacking luster," later "leaden, pale, gray," of uncertain origin, and not found in other Germanic languages. The connecting notion is colorlessness. Perhaps related to wane. Related: Wanly; wanness.
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