Etymology
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boxwood (n.)
also box-wood, "wood of the box-tree," fine and hard-grained, used for handles, etc., 1650s, from box (n.3) + wood (n.).
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dye (n.)

"coloring matter in solution," Middle English deie, from Old English deah, deag "a color, hue, tinge," from Proto-Germanic *daugo (source also of Old Saxon dogol "secret," Old High German tougal "dark, hidden, secret," Old English deagol "secret, hidden; dark, obscure," dohs, dox "dusky, dark").

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trivet (n.)
three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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corn-snake (n.)

popular name of a type of large but harmless rat-snake of the southeastern and central U.S., often found in cornfields, 1670s, from corn (n.1) + snake (n.).

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driftwood (n.)

"wood floating on water," 1630s, from drift (v.) + wood (n.).

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firewood (n.)
also fire-wood, late 14c., from fire (n.) + wood (n.).
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redwood (n.)

also red-wood, 1610s, "wood that has a red hue," from red (adj.1) + wood (n.). Of various types of New World trees that yield such wood, from 1716; specifically the California Sequoia sempervirens from 1819. In Scottish English 16c.-18c. the same word as an adjective meant "completely deranged, raving, stark mad," from wood (adj.).

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decapod (n.)

1819, "ten-legged animal, type of crustacean having ten legs" (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), from French décapode (1806), from Modern Latin Decapoda (animalia), from Greek dekapoda, neuter plural of dekapous "ten-footed" (see ten + foot (n.)). From 1885 in reference to a type of locomotive with ten driving-wheels.

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hylo- 

word-forming element meaning "wood, forest," also "matter," from Greek hylos "a wood, a forest, woodland; wood, firewood, timber; stuff, material," used by Aristotle for "matter" in the philosophical sense; a word of unknown origin.

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prawn (n.)

"long-tailed, ten-footed shrimp-like crustacean, abundant on the shores of the British Isles," early 15c., prayne, a word of unknown origin. "No similar name found in other langs." [OED].

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