Etymology
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finance (n.)
c. 1400, "an end, settlement, retribution," from Old French finance "end, ending; pardon, remission; payment, expense; settlement of a debt" (13c.), noun of action from finer "to end, settle a dispute or debt," from fin (see fine (n.)). Compare Medieval Latin finis "a payment in settlement, fine or tax."

The notion is of "ending" (by satisfying) something that is due (compare Greek telos "end;" plural tele "services due, dues exacted by the state, financial means"). The French senses gradually were brought into English: "ransom" (mid-15c.), "taxation" (late 15c.); the sense of "management of money, science of monetary business" first recorded in English 1770.
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vegetarian (n.)
1839, irregular formation from vegetable (n.) + -arian, as in agrarian, etc. "The general use of the word appears to have been largely due to the formation of the Vegetarian Society in Ramsgate in 1847" [OED]. As an adjective from 1849. An earlier adjective was anti-carnivorous (1828).
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Madagascar 

large island lying to the east of and near Africa, from Mogadishu, the name of the city in Somalia, due to an error by Marco Polo in reading Arabic, whereby he thought the name was that of the island. There is no indigenous name for the whole island. Related: Madagascan; Madagascarian; Madagascarene.

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Patrick 

masc. proper name, from Old Irish Patraicc (Irish Padraig), from Latin Patricius, literally "a patrician" (see patrician). As a given name, chiefly in northern England and Scotland, in Ireland a popular name only after 1600, due probably to the Scots settlers in Ulster. [Reaney]

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roc (n.)

monstrous predatory bird of Arabian mythology, 1570s, from Arabic rukhkh, from Persian rukh. It is mentioned in Marco Polo's account of Madagascar; according to OED, modern use of the word mostly is due to translations of the "Arabian Nights" tales. Hence roc's egg "something marvelous or prodigious." Compare simurgh.

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autogenous (adj.)

"self-generated," 1846, earlier autogeneal (1650s), from Greek autogenetos "self-born," from autos "self" (see auto-) + genetos "born," from genes "formation, creation" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). The modern form and biological use of the word are said to be due to English paleontologist Richard Owen.

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bathe (v.)
Old English baþian "to wash, lave, place in a bath, take a bath" (transitive and intransitive), from root of bath (q.v.), with different vowel sound due to i-mutation. Related: Bathed; bathing. Similar nouns in Old Norse baða, Old High German badon, German baden.
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cytosine (n.)

crystalline base which is one of the constituents of nucleic acids, 1894, from German cytosin (1894), from cyto- "cell" + -ose + chemical suffix -ine (2). "The name cytosine (due to Kossel and Neumann) is misleading. Cytosine is not, like adenosine and guanosine, a nucleoside but the sugar-free base." [Flood]

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pious (adj.)

mid-15c., "having or intended to show faith in and reverence for the Supreme Being," from Latin pius "dutiful, devout, conscientious, religious; faithful to kindred; inspired by friendship, prompted by natural affections," perhaps [de Vaan, Klein] related to Latin purus "pure, clean," via a PIE *pu-io- "purifying" (see pure), but the exact development is disputed.

The classical Roman sense of "having or exhibiting due respect and affection for parents and others to whom such is due" is attested in English from 1620s. In the religious sense, sometimes denoting practice under pretense of religion or for good ends (1630s) and in this sense often coupled with fraud (n.). Related: Piously; piousness.

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Camden (n.)
city in New Jersey, U.S., 1783, named for Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden (1714-1794), Whig politician who was popular in America due to his opposition to British taxation policies and for whom many American towns and counties were named.
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