Etymology
Advertisement
xeric (adj.)

"having little moisture, very dry," 1926; see xero- + -ic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ephah (n.)
Hebrew dry measure, probably of Egyptian origin (compare Coptic epi "measure").
Related entries & more 
wizen (v.)

Old English wisnian, weosnian "to wither, dry up, waste away," from Proto-Germanic *wisnon (source also of Old Norse visna "to wither," Old High German wesanen "to dry up, shrivel, wither;" German verwesen "to decay, rot"). Related: Wizened.

Related entries & more 
terrarium (n.)
1877, from Latin terra "land" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry") + -arium, abstracted from aquarium.
Related entries & more 
barbecue (v.)
"to dry or roast on a gridiron," 1660s, from the source of barbecue (n.). Related: Barbecued; barbecuing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
parch (v.)

late 14c., "to roast or dry" (peas, beans, corn, etc.), a word of uncertain origin. Klein and OED reject derivations from Old North French perchier (Old French percer) "to pierce" and Latin persiccare "to dry thoroughly." Century Dictionary, The Middle English Compendium, and Barnhart suggest it could be from Middle English perchen, a variant of perishen "to perish" (see perish). Klein "tentatively" suggests a back-formation from parchment. A surname Parchecorn is attested from mid-14c. Meaning "to dry with excessive heat, expose to the strong action of fire but without burning" is from mid-15c. Related: Parched; parching.

Related entries & more 
terraqueous (adj.)
"consisting of both land and water," 1650s, from combining form of Latin terra "earth" (from PIE root *ters- "to dry") + aqueous.
Related entries & more 
austere (adj.)
early 14c., from Old French austere "strict, severe, harsh, cruel" (13c., Modern French austère) and directly from Latin austerus "dry, harsh, sour, tart," from Greek austeros "bitter, harsh," especially "making the tongue dry" (originally used of fruits, wines), metaphorically "austere, harsh," from PIE root *saus- "dry" (see sere (adj.)).

From late 14c. as "severe, rigid;" 1590s as "unadorned, simple in style, without luxuries;" 1660s as "grave, sober." Classical literal sense "sour, harsh" (1540s) is rare in English. Related: Austerely; austereness.
Related entries & more 
simoom (n.)
"hot, dry desert wind," 1790, from Arabic samum "a sultry wind," literally "poisonous," from samma "he poisoned," from sam "poison."
Related entries & more 
brut (adj.)
1891, of wines, especially champagnes, "dry, unsweetened," from French brut (14c.), literally "raw, crude" (see brute (adj.)).
Related entries & more 

Page 5