Etymology
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gabardine (n.)

1590s, "dress, covering," variant of gaberdine. Meaning "closely woven cloth" is from 1904.

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bugle (n.2)

"glass bead used to ornament dress," 1570s, of unknown origin.

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black friar (n.)

"friar of the Dominican order," c. 1500, so called from the color of their dress.

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miter (n.1)

in reference to a type of head-dress, an alternative spelling of mitre (see -re).

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garb (v.)

"to dress, clothe, array," 1836, from garb (n.). Related: Garbed (1590s); garbing.

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primp (v.)

1801, "dress or deck (oneself) in a formal and affected manner," probably an extension of prim (q.v.) in its verbal "dress up" sense; compare Scottish primpit "delicate, nice" (c. 1739). Related: Primped; primping.

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Jerry (n.)

World War I British Army slang for "a German; the Germans," 1919, probably an alteration of German based on the male nickname Jerry, popular form of Jeremy. But it also is said to be from the shape of the German helmet, which was thought to resemble a jerry, British slang for "chamber pot, toilet" (1850), this being probably an abbreviation of jeroboam, which is attested in this sense from 1827. Compare jerry-hat "round felt hat" (1841).

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hood (n.1)

"covering," Old English hod "a hood, soft covering for the head" (usually extending over the back of the neck and often attached to a garment worn about the body), from Proto-Germanic *hōd- (source also of Old Saxon, Old Frisian hod "hood," Middle Dutch hoet, Dutch hoed "hat," Old High German huot "helmet, hat," German Hut "hat," Old Frisian hode "guard, protection"), which is of uncertain etymology, perhaps from PIE *kadh- "to cover" (see hat).

Modern spelling is early 1400s to indicate a "long" vowel, which is no longer pronounced as such. Used for hood-like things or animal parts from 17c. Meaning "Foldable or removable cover for a carriage to protect the occupants" is from 1826; meaning "sunshade of a baby-carriage" is by 1866. Meaning "hinged cover for an automobile engine" attested by 1905 (in U.K. generally called a bonnet). Little Red Riding Hood (1729) translates Charles Perrault's Petit Chaperon Rouge ("Contes du Temps Passé" 1697).

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attire (n.)

c. 1300, "equipment of a man-at-arms; apparel, dress, clothes," from attire (v.).

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Stetson 

1902, trademark name, from John B. Stetson (1830-1906), U.S. hat manufacturer, who started his company in Philadelphia in 1865.

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