Etymology
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name-plate (n.)

also nameplate, "plate bearing a person's name," especially one of metal at the door of a residence or place of business, 1823, from name (n.) + plate (n.). Name-board, on the hull of a ship, is from 1846.

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wicket (n.)

early 13c., "small door or gate," especially one forming part of a larger one, from Anglo-French wiket, Old North French wiket (Old French guichet, Norman viquet) "small door, wicket, wicket gate," probably from Proto-Germanic *wik- (source also of Old Norse vik "nook," Old English wican "to give way, yield"), from PIE root *weik- (2) "to bend, to wind." The notion is of "something that turns." Cricket sense of "set of three sticks defended by the batsman" is recorded from 1733; hence many figurative phrases in British English.

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front (adj.)
"relating to the front," 1610s, from front (n.). Front yard first attested 1767; front door is from 1807. The newspaper front page is attested from 1892; as an adjective in reference to sensational news, 1907.
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lock-box (n.)
"a box with a lock" (for keeping valuables, etc.), 1855, from lock (n.1) + box (n.1). Earlier as the name of the metal box containing the external lock mechanism on a door.
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eyehole (n.)

also eye-hole, 1630s, "cavity or socket containing the orbit of the eye," from eye (n.) + hole (n.). By 1856 as "hole or opening, as in a mask or in a curtain or door, through which one may look, a peep hole."  

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forum (n.)
mid-15c., "place of assembly in ancient Rome," from Latin forum "marketplace, open space, public place," apparently akin to foris, foras "out of doors, outside," from PIE root *dhwer- "door, doorway." Sense of "assembly, place for public discussion" first recorded 1680s.
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jib (n.)
"large, triangular foresail of a ship," 1660s, gibb, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to gibbet on the notion of a sail "hanging" from a masthead [Barnhart, OED]; and compare gib "projecting arm of a crane." Or perhaps from the nautical verb jib, jibe "shift a sail or boom to the other side" (1690s), from Dutch gijben, gijpen "turn suddenly" (of sails), which is apparently related to gijk "boom or spar of a sailing ship."

An observant sailor watching a strange vessel approach at sea judges her character by the condition of the jibs; hence cut of (one's) jib "personal appearance" (1821). Related: Jib-boom (1748). The jib in jib-door "door flush with a wall" (1792) is of uncertain origin and probably is not the same word.
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unhinge (v.)
recorded earlier in the mental sense of "to disorder" the mind, etc. (1612) than in the literal one of "to take (a door, etc.) off its hinges" (1616); from un- (2) "opposite of" + hinge (n.). Hinge as a verb meaning "to attach by a hinge" is recorded only from 1758. Related: Unhinged; unhinging.
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mooreeffoc (n.)

"coffee-room, viewed from the inside through a glass door, as it was seen by Dickens on a dark London day; ... used by Chesterton to denote the queerness of things that have become trite, when they are seen suddenly from a new angle." [J.R.R. Tolkien, "On Fairy Stories"]

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undo (v.)
Old English undon "to unfasten and open" (a window or door), "to unfasten by releasing from a fixed position; to cancel, discharge, abrogate, reverse what has been done, put back in a former condition; bring to ruin, destroy," from un- (2) "opposite of" + do (v.). Related: Undone; undoing.
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