Etymology
Advertisement
canicular (adj.)
late 14c., in caniculer dayes, the "dog days" around mid-August, from Latin canicularis "pertaining to the dog days or the Dog Star," from canicula "little dog," also "the Dog Star," diminutive of canis "a dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog"). In literal use ("pertaining to a dog") historically only as attempt at humor.

Also see Sirius, and compare heliacal. The ancient Egyptian canicular year was computed from the heliacal rising of Sirius; the canicular cycle of 1,461 years is how long it would take a given day to pass through all seasons in an uncorrected calendar.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cynanthropy (n.)

"form of madness in which the afflicted imagines himself to be a dog," 1590s, from Latinized form of Greek kynanthropos "of a dog-man,"  from kyōn (genitive kynos) "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-).

Related entries & more 
cynocephalic (adj.)

"having a head like a dog," 1825, from Latin, from Greek kyōn (genitive kynos) "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + kephalikos "pertaining to the head," from kephalē "head" (see cephalo-). Middle English had cino-cephales "fabled race of dog-headed creatures" (c. 1300).

Related entries & more 
pooch (n.)

"dog," 1917, American English, of unknown origin. Earlier it was a dog name, attested as such by 1901 as the name of a dog owned by Dick Craine, "the Klondike pioneer" (the article in the May 12 Buffalo Courier reports: " 'Pooch' is the Alaskan name for whisky, and although the dog is not addicted to the use of this stimulant, he is a genuine Eskimo dog, and, therefore, it is appropriate"). Harvard coach "Pooch" Donovan also was much in the news during the early years of 20c.

Related entries & more 
Caleb 
masc. proper name, in the Bible, one of the 12 men sent by Moses to reconnoiter Canaan, from Hebrew Kalebh, literally "dog-like," from kelebh "dog."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
corgi (n.)

"breed of short-legged dog originally bred in Wales for herding cattle," 1921, from Welsh corgi, from cor "dwarf" + ci "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog").

Related entries & more 
chenille (n.)

"kind of velvety cord used in embroidery, fringes, etc.," 1738, from French chenille, properly "caterpillar," literally "little dog" (13c.), from Latin canicula "a dog" (also "a violent woman; the star Sirius; the worst throw in dice"), diminutive of canis "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog"). So called for its furry look. Compare caterpillar.

Related entries & more 
shih-tzu (n.)
also shih tzu, breed of small long-haired dog, 1921, from Chinese shizigou, from shi "lion" + zi "son" + gou "dog."
Related entries & more 
arr (v.)
"to growl like a dog," late 15c., imitative. In classical times, the letter R was called littera canina "the dog letter" (Persius).
Related entries & more 
Weimaraner (n.)
dog breed, 1943, from Weimar, german city, + German suffix -aner indicating "of this place." Originally bred as a hunting dog in the Weimar region.
Related entries & more 

Page 5