Etymology
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glaucoma (n.)
1640s (cataracts and glaucoma not distinguished until c. 1705), from Latinized form of Greek glaukoma "cataract, opacity of the lens," perhaps from glaukommatos "gray-eyed," with omma "the eye" + glaukos, an adjective of uncertain origin (see glaucous).
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inhabitant (n.)
"one who dwells in a place" (as distinguished from a visitor or transient), early 15c., from Anglo-French inhabitant, from Latin inhabitantem (nominative inhabitans), present participle of inhabitare "to dwell in" (see inhabit). Related: Inhabitants. As an adjective, also from early 15c.
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mine (n.2)

"explosive device," by 1866 in reference to submarine weapons (at first not distinguished from torpedoes), from mine (v.2). By 1890 as "land-mine, explosive device placed on the ground (or just under it) as a weapon."

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cortical (adj.)

1670s, in botany, "belonging to external covering," from Modern Latin corticalis "resembling or consisting of bark or rind," from cortex (genitive corticis) "bark of a tree" (from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut"). Also used in anatomy, applied to enveloping parts (distinguished from medullary).

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a la carte 
"ordered by separate items" (itemized on a bill); distinguished from a table d'hôte, indicating a meal served at a fixed, inclusive price; 1826, from French à la carte, literally "by the card" (see a la + card (n.1)).
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dentin (n.)

also dentine, the bone-like substance in teeth (as distinguished from enamel or pulp), 1836, from combining form of Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + chemical suffix -in (2). Related: Dentinal.

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flatware (n.)
1851, from flat (adj.), which was used from late 14c. of plates, dishes, saucers in a sense "shallow; smooth-surfaced" + ware (n.). Originally as distinguished from hollow ware; U.S. sense of "domestic cutlery" recorded by 1895.
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smallpox (n.)
acute, highly contagious disease, 1510s, small pokkes, as distinguished from great pox "syphilis;" from small-pock "pustule caused by smallpox" (mid-15c.); see small (adj.) + pox. Compare French petite vérole. Fatal in a quarter to a third of unvaccinated cases.
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longbow (n.)
also long-bow, the bow of war and chase in medieval Europe and the characteristic weapon of the English soldiery, only gradually superseded by firearms; late 14c., from long (adj.) + bow (n.1). Distinguished from the crossbow, but especially of bows five feet or longer.
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levulose (n.)

old name of the sugar isomeric with dextrose but distinguished from it by turning the plane of polarization to the left, 1865 (1864 in German) from Latin laevus "left" (from PIE *laiwo- "left;" see left (adj.)) + sugar ending -ose (2). 

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