Etymology
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omphalo- 

before vowels omphal-, word-forming element meaning "navel," from Greek omphalos (see omphalos).

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hyalo- 

word-forming element in scientific compounds meaning "of glass; glass-like, transparent," from Greek hyalos "glass, clear alabaster, crystal lens used as a burning glass," apparently a non-Greek word, said to be of Egyptian origin (glass was first made in Egypt).

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cero- 

word-forming element meaning "wax, waxy," from Latinized form of Greek kēros "beeswax," a word of unknown origin with no obvious ulterior connections. "As there is no evidence for Indo-European apiculture, we have to reckon with foreign origin for κηρός" [Beekes].

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gyno- 

word-forming element especially in modern medical and botanical words equivalent to gyneco-.

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bryo- 

word-forming element meaning "moss" in scientific compounds, from Greek bryos, bryon "moss."

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sphygmo- 

word-forming element meaning "pulse," from Greek sphygmos "a pulse," from sphyzein "to throb, pulse, beat."

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myco- 

before vowels myc-, word-forming element meaning "mushroom, fungus," formed irregularly from Latinized form of Greek mykēs "fungus, mushroom, anything shaped like a mushroom," a word of uncertain origin (Beekes doubts the traditional explanation that connects it to the source of mucus). The correct form is myceto- (mycet-).

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helio- 

word-forming element meaning "sun," from Greek hēlios "sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun").

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oleo- 

word-forming element meaning "oil" or "oleic," from Latin oleum (see oil (n.)).

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circum- 

word-forming element meaning "around, round about, all around, on all sides," from Latin adverb and preposition circum "around, round about," literally "in a circle," probably accusative form of circus "ring" (see circus). The Latin word was commonly used in word-formation. In French, the element became circon-; Kitchin points out that con for cum is common even in classical Latin. For sense development, compare German rings "around."

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