Etymology
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taro (n.)
tropical food plant, 1769, from Polynesian (Tahitian or Maori) taro. Compare Hawaiian kalo.
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fodder (n.)
Old English fodder "food," especially "hay, straw, or other bulk food for cattle," from Proto-Germanic *fodram (source also of Old Norse foðr, Middle Dutch voeder, Old High German fuotar, German Futter), from PIE *pa-trom, suffixed form of root *pa- "to feed."
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delicacies (n.)

"things dainty and gratifying to the palate," early 15c., plural of delicacy in the "fine food" sense.

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pittance (n.)

c. 1200, pitaunce, "pious donation to a religious house or order to provide extra food; the extra food provided," also "a small portion, scanty rations," from Old French pitance "pity, mercy, compassion; refreshment, nourishment; portion of food allowed a monk or poor person by a pious bequest," apparently literally "pity," from the source pity. Perhaps via Medieval Latin *pietantia, from an assumed verb *pietare, or otherwise derived from Latin pietas. Meaning "small amount, portion, or quantity" is attested by 1560s.

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bromatography (n.)
"a description of foods," 1844, from combining form of Greek broma "food" + -graphy "a writing, recording, or description."
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provision (v.)

"to supply with things necessary," especially a store of food, 1787, from provision (n.). Related: Provisioned; provisioning.

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burrito (n.)
Mexican food dish, 1934, from Spanish, literally "little burro" (see burro).
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nurture (n.)

c. 1300, norture, "upbringing, the act or responsibility of rearing a child," also "breeding, manners, courtesy," from Old French norture, nourreture "food, nourishment; education, training," from Late Latin nutritia "a nursing, suckling," from Latin nutrire "to nourish, suckle" (see nourish). From mid-14c. as "nourishment, food."

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chum (n.2)

"fish bait," consisting usually of pieces of some other fish, 1857, perhaps from Scottish chum "food."

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Waring 
brand name of a type of food blender, 1944, manufactured by Waring Products Corp., N.Y., U.S.
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