Etymology
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magna cum laude 

designating a diploma or degree of higher standard than average, by 1856, Latin, literally "with great praise;" from magna (see magnate) + cum laude.

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overstrain (v.)

also over-strain, 1580s, transitive, "exert to an injurious degree," from over- + strain (v.). Intransitive sense of "strain or strive to excess" is by 1703. Related: Overstrained; overstraining.

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grade (v.)
1650s, "to arrange in grades," from grade (n.). Meaning "to reduce (a road, etc.) to a level or degree of inclination" is from 1835. Meaning "assign a letter mark to" is from 1931. Related: Graded; grading.
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somewhat (adv.)
c. 1200, "in a certain amount, to a certain degree," from some + what. Replaced Old English sumdæl, sume dæle "somewhat, some portion," literally "some deal."
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sensibly (adv.)

late 14c., sensibli, "in a manner perceived to the senses," from sensible + -ly (2). From 1670s as "in an appreciable degree;" the meaning "with good sense" is attested from 1755.

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equalize (v.)
1580s, "make equal, cause to be equal in amount or degree," from equal (adj.) + -ize. Sports score sense attested by 1925. Related: Equalized; equalizing.
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materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

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extreme (adj.)
early 15c., "outermost, farthest;" also "utter, total, in greatest degree" (opposed to moderate), from Old French extreme (13c.), from Latin extremus "outermost, utmost, farthest, last; the last part; extremity, boundary; highest or greatest degree," superlative of exterus (see exterior). In English as in Latin, not always felt as a superlative, hence more extreme, most extreme (which were condemned by Johnson). Extreme unction preserves the otherwise extinct sense of "last, latest" (15c.).
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graduand (n.)
in British universities, a student who has passed the necessary examinations but not yet graduated, 1882, from Medieval Latin graduandus, gerundive of graduari "to have a degree" (see graduate (n.)).
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removed (adj.)

"distant in relationship" (by some expressed degree, for example first cousin once removed), 1540s, from past participle of remove (v.). Meaning "remote, separated, secluded" from something is from 1610s.

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