Etymology
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syphilis (n.)

infectious venereal disease, 1718, Modern Latin, originally from the title of a poem, "Syphilis, sive Morbus Gallicus" "Syphilis, or the French Disease," published 1530, by Veronese doctor Girolamo Fracastoro (1483-1553), which tells the tale of the shepherd Syphilus, supposed to be the first sufferer from the disease. Fracastoro first used the word as a generic term for the disease in his 1546 treatise "De Contagione." Why he chose the name is unknown; it may be intended as Latinized Greek for "Pig-lover," though there was also a Sipylus, a son of Niobe, in Ovid.

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hoove 

cattle disease, 1840, from alternative past tense form of heave.

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rachitic (adj.)

"afflicted with rickets," 1797, from rachitis (1727), medical Latin name for the bone disease, from Late Greek rhakhitis (nosos) "rachitic (disease), inflammation of the spine," from Greek rhakhis "spine, back," metaphorically "ridge (of a mountain), rib of a leaf" (see rachio-).

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CDC 

abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.

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-pathy 

word-forming element meaning "feeling, suffering, emotion; disorder, disease," from Latin -pathia, from Greek -patheia "act of suffering, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Meaning "system of treatment of disease, method, cure, curative treatment" is abstracted from homeopathy (q.v.).

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yaws (n.)

contagious skin disease, 1670s, from Carib yaya, the native name for it.

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neuropathy (n.)

"disease of the nervous system," 1827, from neuro- + -pathy. Related: Neuropath; neuropathic; neuropathist.

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imperfection (n.)

late 14c., "incompleteness, deficiency, lack," from Old French imperfeccion "defect; imperfect state" (12c.) and directly from Late Latin imperfectionem (nominative imperfectio) "imperfection," noun of action from Latin imperfectus "imperfect"(see imperfect). Meaning "an instance of being imperfect" is from early 15c.

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radiotherapy (n.)

"treatment of disease by means of x-rays," 1902, from radio- + therapy.

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distemper (n.)

"unbalanced or unnatural temper," 1550s, from distemper (v.). Middle English expressed the idea by distempering, distemperure.  From 1640s as "disease of the body, malady, indisposition;" specifically in reference to a wasting disease of young dogs by 1747, later extended to other animals.

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