Etymology
Advertisement
marimba (n.)

kind of deep-toned xylophone, originally in Africa, 1704, from an African language, probably from the Bantu group (compare Kimbundu and Swahili marimba, malimba, name of a xylophone-like instrument).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chimichanga (n.)

"deep-fried burrito," by 1964; the thing and the name for it seem to have originated somewhere along the western U.S.-Mexico border (Arizona, Sonora). The name is said to mean "trinket" in Mexican Spanish.

Related entries & more 
coulee (n.)

"deep ravine, seasonally flooded," 1804, a North American word, originally used in areas explored by French trappers, from French coulée "flow" (17c.), from fem. past participle of couler "to flow," from Latin colare "to filter, strain" (see colander).

Related entries & more 
mire (n.)

"deep mud, bog, marsh, swampland," c. 1300, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse myrr "bog, swamp," from Proto-Germanic *miuzja- (source of Old English mos "bog, marsh"), from PIE *meus- "damp" (see moss).

Related entries & more 
aphotic (adj.)

"untouched by sunlight, lightless" (in reference to deep-sea regions), 1894, Modern Latin, from Greek a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phōs (genitive phōtos) "light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + -ic. Aphotic zone is recorded from 1913.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mal du siecle (n.)

by 1884, from French mal du sìecle, "world-weariness, atrophy of the spirit, aristocratic boredom, deep melancholy over the condition of the world," supposedly a characteristic condition of young romantics in Europe in the early 19c. It answers to German Weltschmerz.

Related entries & more 
coelomate (adj.)

"having a body cavity distinct from the intestinal cavity," 1883, from Coelomata (1877), from Modern Latin neuter plural of coelomatus, from Greek koilomat- "hollow, cavity," from koilos "hollow, hollowed out, spacious, deep," from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole."

Related entries & more 
digitate (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digitate

1660s, in zoology, "having separate fingers and toes," from Latin digitatus "having fingers or toes," from digitus "finger" (see digit). In botany, "having deep, radiating divisions, like fingers," by 1788.

Related entries & more 
keld (n.)
"a spring," 1690s, limited to northern dialect, but frequent in place names; from Old Norse kelda "a well, fountain, spring," also "a deep, still, smooth part of a river," from a Germanic verbal root represented by German quellen "to swell, spring, gush."
Related entries & more 
abyssal (adj.)
1690s, "unfathomable, unsearchably deep, like an abyss," from abyss + -al (1). Since 19c. mainly "inhabiting or belonging to the depths of the ocean" (used especially of the zone of ocean water below 300 fathoms), though in 19c. abysmal was more common in oceanography.
Related entries & more 

Page 5