Etymology
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persimmon (n.)

the North American date-plum, a tree common in the U.S. South, 1610s, from Powhatan (Algonquian) pasimenan "fruit dried artificially," from pasimeneu "he dries fruit," containing Proto-Algonquian */-min-/ "fruit, berry."

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postmark (n.)

"mark or stamp of a post office placed on a letter, etc., giving the place and date of sending," 1670s, from post (n.3) + mark (n.1). As a verb from 1716. Related: Postmarked; postmarking.

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latest (adj.)
c. 1200, "last, final," superlative of late. From 1590s as "most recent." As a noun, 1520s, "the last in order." Colloquial the latest "the news" attested from 1886. At the latest "at the most distant date" is from 1884.
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expiate (v.)
c. 1600 (OED 2nd ed. print entry has a typographical error in the earliest date), from Latin expiatus, past participle of expiare "to make amends, atone for" (see expiation). Related: Expiable (1560s); expiated; expiating.
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chirarism (n.)

"the thrill of an unexpected glimpse of something erotically suggestive that is normally hidden," by 2001, from Japanese, from chirari "a glance, a glimpse" + English -ism. The sense extension in Japanese to subtly erotic situations and expressions is said to date from the 1950s. 

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pre-exilic (adj.)

"existing or done before exile," 1884, chiefly in reference to Biblical writings supposed to date before the Jewish exile (586-537 B.C.E.), from pre- "before" + exile (n.) + -ic.

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bell (v.)
"attach a bell to," late 14c., from bell (n.). Related: Belled; belling. Allusions to the story of the mice that undertook to bell the cat (so they can hear him coming) date to late 14c.
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abreast (adv.)
mid-15c., a contraction of on brest "side-by-side," from a- (1) + breast (n.); the notion is of "with breasts in line." To keep abreast in figurative sense of "stay up-to-date" is from 1650s.
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hepcat (n.)

also hep-cat, "addict of swing music," more generally, "one who is in the know and knows it," 1937, from hep (1) "aware, up-to-date" in jazz slang + cat (n.) in the slang sense "jazz enthusiast."

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hep (1)

"aware, up-to-date," first recorded 1908 in "Saturday Evening Post," but said to be underworld slang, of unknown origin. Variously said to have been the name of "a fabulous detective who operated in Cincinnati" [Louis E. Jackson and C.R. Hellyer, "A Vocabulary of Criminal Slang," 1914] or a saloonkeeper in Chicago who "never quite understood what was going on ... (but) thought he did" [American Speech, XVI, 154/1]. Taken up by jazz musicians by 1915. With the rise of hip (adj.) by the 1950s, the use of hep ironically became a clue that the speaker was unaware and not up-to-date.

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