Etymology
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fete (n.)
1754, from French fête "festival, feast," from Old French feste "feast, celebration" (see feast (n.)). If the date is right, first used in English by Horace Walpole (1717-1797).
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appointment (n.)
early 15c., "an agreement," also "a fixing of a date for official business," from Old French apointement, from apointer "arrange, settle, place" (see appoint). Meaning "act of placing in office" is attested from 1650s.
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Proto-Indo-European (n.)

the hypothetical reconstructed ancestral language of the Indo-European family, by 1905. The time scale of the "language" itself is much debated, but a recent date proposed for it is about 5,500 years ago. 

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malleolus (n.)

bone knob on either side of the human ankle, 1690s, from Latin malleolus, diminutive of malleus "a hammer" (from PIE root *mele- "to crush, grind"). Anatomical use is said to date to Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564). Related: Malleolar.

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persimmon (n.)

the North American date-plum, a tree common in the U.S. South, 1610s, from Powhatan (Algonquian) pasimenan "fruit dried artificially," from pasimeneu "he dries fruit," containing Proto-Algonquian */-min-/ "fruit, berry."

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postmark (n.)

"mark or stamp of a post office placed on a letter, etc., giving the place and date of sending," 1670s, from post (n.3) + mark (n.1). As a verb from 1716. Related: Postmarked; postmarking.

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light bulb (n.)
also lightbulb, 1884, from light (n.) + bulb (n.). Changing one as figurative of something easy to do is from 1920s; jokes about how many of a certain type it takes to change one date from 1971.
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latest (adj.)
c. 1200, "last, final," superlative of late. From 1590s as "most recent." As a noun, 1520s, "the last in order." Colloquial the latest "the news" attested from 1886. At the latest "at the most distant date" is from 1884.
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pre-exilic (adj.)

"existing or done before exile," 1884, chiefly in reference to Biblical writings supposed to date before the Jewish exile (586-537 B.C.E.), from pre- "before" + exile (n.) + -ic.

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expiate (v.)
c. 1600 (OED 2nd ed. print entry has a typographical error in the earliest date), from Latin expiatus, past participle of expiare "to make amends, atone for" (see expiation). Related: Expiable (1560s); expiated; expiating.
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