Etymology
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slot (v.1)
1747, "provide with a slot, cut slots in," from slot (n.1). Meaning "drop a coin in a slot" is from 1888. Sense of "take a position in a slot" is from 1940; that of "fit (something) into a slot" is from 1966. Oldest sense is obsolete: "stab in the base of the throat" (c. 1400). Related: Slotted; slotting.
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abscise (v.)
Origin and meaning of abscise
"to cut off or away," 1610s, from Latin abscisus, past participle of abscidere "to cut away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + caedere "to cut, cut down" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). Related: Abscised; abscising.
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resect (v.)

"cut off or away, pare off," 1650s, from Latin resectus, past participle of resecare "to cut off, cut loose, curtail," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). The surgical sense of "excising of some part," of a bone, etc., (1846) seems to be the sole surviving one. Related: Resected; resecting.

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scissile (adj.)

"capable of being cut or divided," 1620s, from Latin scissilis, from scindere "to cut" (from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split").

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excise (v.)

"cut out," 1570s, from French exciser, from Latin excisus, past participle of excidere "cut out, cut down, cut off; destroy," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -cidere, combining form of caedere "to cut down" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). Related: Excised; excising.

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cuttable (adj.)

"capable of being cut or removed," mid-15c., from cut (v.) + -able.

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bisect (v.)
"to cut in two," 1640s, from Modern Latin bisectus, from Latin bi- "two" (see bi-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Related: Bisected; bisecting.
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transect (v.)
"to cut across," 1630s, from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + sectus, past participle of secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Related: Transected; transecting.
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electrolysis (n.)

"decomposition into constituent parts by an electric current," 1834; the name was introduced by Faraday on the suggestion of the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, from electro- + Greek lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to loosen, set free" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Originally of tumors, later (1879) of hair removal. Related: electrolytic.

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retrench (v.2)

"cut off, cut down, pare away" (expenses, etc.), 1620s, from obsolete French retrencher "to cut off, lessen, shorten" (Modern French retrancher, Old French retrenchier), from re- "back" (see re-) + Old French trenchier "to cut" (see trench). Especially "reduce (expenses) by economy" (1709). Related: Retrenched; retrenching.

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