Etymology
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-eme 
in linguistics, noted as an active suffix and word-formation element from 1953; from French -ème "unit, sound," from phonème (see phoneme).
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candela (n.)
unit of luminous intensity, 1950, from Latin candela "a light, torch, candle made of tallow or wax" (see candle).
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farad (n.)
unit of electric capacity, suggested 1861, first used 1868, named for English physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867). Related: Faradic.
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gauss 
C.G.S. unit of intensity of a magnetic field, 1882, named for German mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Related: Gaussage; gaussian.
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Deutsch 

the German word for "German;" see Dutch. Deutschmark (abbreviation DM), the monetary unit of the old German Federal Republic, was introduced June 1948.

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bar (n.4)

unit of pressure, coined 1903 from Greek baros "weight," which is related to barys "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy").

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Hertz 
unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second, 1928, named in reference to German physicist Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894). Related: Hertzian.
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Kelvin 
unit of absolute temperature scale, 1911, in honor of British physicist Sir William Thompson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907).
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milli- 

word-forming element meaning "thousand; thousandth part (of a metric unit)," from combining form of Latin mille "thousand" (see million).

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aggregate (n.)
"number of persons, things, etc., regarded as a unit," early 15c., from Latin noun use of adjective aggregatum, neuter of aggregatus "associated, united," literally "united in a flock" (see aggregate (adj.)).
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