Etymology
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cruciform (adj.)

"cross-shaped," 1660s, from Modern Latin cruciformis, from Latin crux (genitive crucis) "stake, cross" (see crux) + forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)).

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crossbar (n.)

also cross-bar, "a transverse bar, bar laid or fixed transversely on another or others," mid-15c., from cross- + bar (n.1).

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questionnaire (n.)

"list of questions by which information is sought from a select group," 1901, from French questionnaire "list of formal questions," from questionner "to question," (see question (v.)). Purists long resisted it, preferring the native formation questionary (mid-15c. as "a scholastic questioner"); see -ary.

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crossbones (n.)

also cross-bones, "figure of two thigh-bones laid across each other in the form of an X," 1798, from cross- + bone (n.).

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crossroad (n.)

also cross-road, 1680s, "road that crosses from one main road to another;" 1719 as "one of two or more roads that cross each other," from cross- + road. Meaning "place where two roads cross each other" is by 1808. Figurative sense "a turning point, a moment of decision" is from 1733.

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cruciferous (adj.)

"bearing a cross," 1650s, from Late Latin crucifer "cross-bearing," from Latin crux (genitive crucis) "stake, cross" (see crux). Originally in literal senses; botanical use (in reference to a symmetrical arrangement of four petals) is from 1851.

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cruise (v.)

"sail to and fro or from place to place," 1650s, from Dutch kruisen "to cross, sail to and fro," from kruis "cross," from Latin crux. Compare the sense evolution in cognate cross (v.). Related: Cruised; cruising.

As a noun from 1706, "a voyage taken in courses;" by 1906 as "voyage taken by tourists on a ship."

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question (v.)

late 15c., questiounen, "to inquire, ask, seek to know," from question (n.) and from Old French questioner "ask questions, interrogate, torture" (13c.), from question (n.). Hence "to dispute, doubt," by 1530s. Transitive sense of "inquire of by asking questions" is from late 15c. Related: Questioned; questioning. Alternative verb questionize is attested from 1847.

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crantara (n.)

"The fiery cross which in old times formed the rallying symbol in the Highlands of Scotland in any sudden emergency," Gaelic cranntara, cranntaraidh, also (by influence of crois "cross") croistara, croistaraidh, literally "the beam or cross of reproach," from crann "a beam, a shaft" (see crane (n.)) + tair "reproach, disgrace." "[S]o called because neglect of the symbol implied infamy" [Century Dictionary].

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crossway (n.)

also cross-way, c. 1300, "a crossroad," from cross- + way (n.). Crossways (adv.) "crosswise, transversely," with adverbial genitive -s, is from c. 1300.

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