Etymology
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benday 

also Ben-Day, by 1905, a printing and photoengraving technique involving overlay sheets of small dots or lines, used to create shadow effect, etc., named for U.S. printer and illustrator Benjamin Day Jr., who developed it c. 1879.

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*ker- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grow."

It forms all or part of: accretion; accrue; cereal; Ceres; concrete; create; creation; creature; Creole; crescendo; crescent; crew (n.) "group of soldiers;" croissant; cru; decrease; Dioscuri; excrescence; excrescent; griot; increase; Kore; procerity; procreate; procreation; recreate; recreation; recruit; sincere.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek kouros "boy," korē "girl;" Latin crescere "come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell," Ceres, goddess of agriculture, creare "to bring forth, create, produce;" Armenian serem "bring forth," serim "be born."

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phanopoeia (n.)

1929, Pound's term for "a casting of images upon the visual imagination" in literature, from Greek phanai "to show, make visible, bring to light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + poiein "to make, create" (see poet).

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mint (v.)

"to stamp metal to make coins," 1540s, from mint (n.2). Related: Minted; minting. Old English had the agent noun mynetere (Middle English minter) "one who stamps coins to create money," from Late Latin monetarius.

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art brut (n.)

"art done by prisoners, lunatics, etc.," by 1948, as l'art brut, in a brief biography of Jean Dubuffet for Yale French Studies. French, literally "raw art" (see art (n.) + brute (adj.)).

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hazmat 
also HAZMAT, 1977, telescoped from hazardous material(s).
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materially (adv.)

late 14c., "with, in, by, or with reference to matter or material things," from material (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "to an important extent or degree, essentially" is from 1650s.

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reinvent (v.)

also re-invent, "invent again or anew," 1680s, from re- "again" + invent (v.). Especially "devise or create anew without knowledge of a previous invention;" phrase reinvent the wheel "do redundant work" is attested by 1971. Related: Reinvented; reinventing.  

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materiel (n.)

"the totality of things used in the carrying out of any complex art or technique" (as distinguished from personnel), 1814, from French matériel "material," noun use of adj. matériel (see material (adj.)). A later borrowing of the same word that became material (n.). By 1819 in the specific sense of "articles, supplies, machinery, etc. used in the military."

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scrawny (adj.)

"meager, wasted, raw-boned," 1824, apparently a dialectal variant of scranny "lean, thin" (1820), which is of uncertain origin but probably from a Scandinavian source, perhaps Old Norse skrælna "to shrivel." Compare scrannel. Related: Scrawniness.

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