Etymology
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innumerable (adj.)
mid-14c., from Latin innumerabilis "countless, immeasurable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + numerabilis "able to be numbered," from numerare "to count, number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Related: Innumerability.
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rite (n.)

early 14c., "formal act or procedure of religious observance performed according to an established manner," from Latin ritus "custom, usage," especially "a religious observance or ceremony" (source also of Spanish, Italian rito), which perhaps is from PIE root *re- "to reason, count," on the notion of "to count; to observe carefully." Rite of passage (1909), marking the end of one phase and the start of another in an individual life, is translated from French rite de passage, coined by French anthropologist Arnold van Gennep (1873-1957).

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zeppelin (n.)
1900, from German Zeppelin, short for Zeppelinschiff "Zeppelin ship," after Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin (1838-1917), German general who perfected its design. Compare blimp. Related: Zeppelinous.
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Brazzaville 

capital of Republic of Congo, named for French explorer Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, who founded it in 1883. An Italian count, his title is from the Adriatic island of Brazza, now Brač in Croatia.

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numerative (adj.)

1788, "pertaining to numbering or numeration," from Latin numerat-, past-participle stem of numerare "to count, number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)) + -ive. Related: Numeratively.

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renumber (v.)

also re-number, "count again; fix a new number to," early 15c., from re- "again" + number (v.). Related: Renumbered; renumbering. Middle English also had renombren (mid-15c.), from Old French renombrer.

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aim (v.)
c. 1300, "to estimate (number or size), calculate, count" (senses now obsolete), from Old French aesmer, esmer (Old North French amer) "to value, rate; count, estimate," ultimately from Latin aestimare "appraise, determine the value of" (see esteem (v.)).

Meaning in English apparently developed from "calculate," to "calculate with a view to action, plan," then to "direct a missile, a blow, etc." (late 14c.). Also used in Middle English of directing a letter, planting an altar, pitching a tent. Intransitive sense "intend, attempt" (early 14c.) was used by Shakespeare but is now considered colloquial. Related: Aimed; aiming.
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pro rata 

"in proportion," from Medieval Latin pro rata (parte) "according to the calculated (share)," from pro "for, in accordance with" (see pro-) + rata, ablative singular of ratus, past participle of reri "to count, reckon" (see rate (n.)).

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numerate (adj.)

early 15c., "numbered, counted," from Latin numeratus "counted out," past participle of numerare "to count, to number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). By 1959 as "acquainted with the basic principles of mathematics" (see numeracy).

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Rathaus (n.)

German town hall, 1610s, from German Rathaus, literally "council house," from Rat "council" (from Proto-Germanic *redaz, from suffixed form of PIE root *re- "to reason, count") + Haus "house" (see house (n.)).

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