Etymology
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enrollment (n.)

also enrolment, mid-15c., "act of enrolling, official copy or record of a statute," from Anglo-French enrollement, from Old French enroller "record in a register" (see enroll). Meaning "total number enrolled" is from 1859, American English.

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descriptive (adj.)

"serving or aiming to describe," 1751, from Late Latin descriptivus, from descript-, past-participle stem of describere "to write down, copy; sketch, represent," from de "down" (see de-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Related: Descriptively; descriptiveness.

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exemplar (n.)
late 14c., "original model of the universe in the mind of God," later (mid-15c.) "model of virtue," from Old French exemplaire (14c.) and directly from Late Latin exemplarium, from Latin exemplum "a copy, pattern, model" (see example). Related: Exemplarily.
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archaism (n.)
1640s, "retention of what is old and obsolete," from Modern Latin archaismus, from Greek arkhaismos, from arkhaizein "to copy the ancients" (in language, etc.); see archaic. Meaning "that which is archaic," especially "an archaic word or expression," is by 1748.
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simular (n.)
1520s, "one who simulates," irregularly formed (perhaps on the model of similar) from Latin simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). As an adjective, "simulated," from 1610s.
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simulacrum (n.)

1590s, from Latin simulacrum "likeness, image, form, representation, portrait," a dissimilation of *simulaclom, from simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). The word was borrowed earlier as semulacre (late 14c.), via Old French simulacre.

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transcribe (v.)
1550s, from Latin transcribere "to copy, write again in another place, write over, transfer," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). To do it poorly is to transcribble (1746). Related: Transcribed; transcriber; transcribing.
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reproduce (v.)

1610s, transitive, "to bring into existence again," from re- "again" + produce (v.), probably on model of French reproduire (16c.). Sense of "make a copy or representation of" is recorded by 1850. The intransitive sense of "generate offspring, procreate" is by 1894. Related: Reproduced; reproducing.

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exemplification (n.)

mid-15c., exemplificacioun, "illustration or demonstration by example," from Anglo-French exemplificacion "attested copy or transcript of a document" (late 14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin exemplificationem (nominative exemplificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of exemplificare "to illustrate" (see exemplify). Holinshed had a back-formation exemplificate.

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duplicate (adj.)

early 15c., "having two parts, double," from Latin duplicatus, past participle of duplicare "to double," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Meaning "exactly corresponding, that is an exact copy of" is from 1812.

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