Etymology
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brainwashing (n.)
"attempt to alter or control the thoughts and beliefs of another person against his will by psychological techniques," 1950, a literal translation of Chinese xi nao. A term from the Korean War.
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administrate (v.)
"manage or direct affairs," 1630s, from Latin administratus, past participle of administrare "manage, control, superintend" (see administer) or else a back-formation from administrator, administration. Related: Administrated; administrating.
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nationalize (v.)

1794, "invest with a national character;" see national + -ize. Probably inspired by French nationaliser, noted by 1795 as one of the coinages of the Revolution. Meaning "bring under state control" is from 1869. Related: Nationalized; nationalizing.

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monetarist (adj.)

1914, "of a monetary character or having a monetary basis," from monetary + -ist. As a noun, "one who advocates tight control of the money supply to remedy inflation," by 1963. Related Monetarism (1963).

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harness (v.)
"to put a harness on a draught animal," c. 1300, from Old French harneschier "make ready, equip, arm," from harnois (see harness (n.)); figurative sense "to control for use as power" is from 1690s. Related: Harnessed; harnessing.
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appropre (v.)

mid-14c., appropren, "acquire possession or control, to appropriate, take possession of," from Old French apropriier "annex; make fit or suitable" (12c., Modern French appropre), from Late Latin appropriare "make one's own" (see appropriate (v.)).

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disposal (n.)

1620s, "power to make use of, right to dispose of or control;" see dispose + -al (2). Meaning "a disposing" (of a daughter by marriage, of money by a will, of an estate by sale, etc.) is from 1650s; of waste material, from c. 1960, originally in medical use.

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police (v.)
Origin and meaning of police

1580s, "to watch, guard, or keep order; to govern," from French policer, from police (see police (n.)). The original sense is obsolete. The meaning "to control or keep order in by means of police" is from 1837; figurative use by 1885. Related: Policed; policing.

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overrule (v.)

also over-rule, "rule against; set aside, as by a higher authority," 1590s, from over- + rule (v.). It was used earlier in a sense "to govern, control, have sway over" (1570s). Related: Overruled; overruling.

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Sophronia 

fem. proper name, from Greek sōphrōnia, from sōphrōn (genitive sōphrōnos) "discreet, prudent, sensible, having control over sensual desires, moderate, chaste," literally "of sound mind," from sōs "safe, sound, whole" + phrēn "heart, mind" (see phreno-).

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