Etymology
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technology (n.)
Origin and meaning of technology

1610s, "a discourse or treatise on an art or the arts," from Latinized form of Greek tekhnologia "systematic treatment of an art, craft, or technique," originally referring to grammar, from tekhno-, combining form of tekhnē "art, skill, craft in work; method, system, an art, a system or method of making or doing," from PIE *teks-na- "craft" (of weaving or fabricating), from suffixed form of root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate." For ending, see -logy.

The meaning "study of mechanical and industrial arts" (Century Dictionary, 1895, gives as examples "spinning, metal-working, or brewing") is recorded by 1859. High technology is attested by 1964; short form high-tech by 1972.

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-pathy 

word-forming element meaning "feeling, suffering, emotion; disorder, disease," from Latin -pathia, from Greek -patheia "act of suffering, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Meaning "system of treatment of disease, method, cure, curative treatment" is abstracted from homeopathy (q.v.).

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demonstrator (n.)

1610s, "one who points out or proves," agent noun in Latin form from demonstrate. From 1680s as "one who uses specimens or experiments as a method of teaching;" 1870 as "one who participates in public demonstrations."

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kick-start (v.)

1919 (implied in kick-starter), "method of starting an internal combustion engine (of a motorcycle) by pushing down a lever with the foot," from kick (n.) + start (n.). Figurative sense of "take a course of action that will quickly start a process" is by 1995.

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gouache (n.)

method of painting, 1868, from French gouache "watercolors, water-color painting" (18c.), from Italian guazzo "watercolor," originally "spray, splash, puddle, pool," from Latin aquatio "watering, watering place," from aquatus, past participle of aquari "to bring water for drinking," from aqua "water" (from PIE root *akwa- "water").

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bandanna (n.)

also often bandana, 1752, from Hindi bandhnu, a method of dyeing, from Sanskrit badhnati "binds" (because the cloth is tied in different places like modern tie-dye), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind." Perhaps to English via Portuguese. The colors and spots are what makes it a bandanna.

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aerobics (n.)

method of exercise and a fad in early 1980s, American English, coined 1968 by U.S. physician Kenneth H. Cooper (b. 1931), from aerobic (also see -ics) on the notion of activities which require modest oxygen intake and thus can be maintained.

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isometric (adj.)

1838, literally "of the same measure," from iso- "the same, equal" + -metric. The components are Greek: isos "equal, identical" + metron "a measure." Originally a method of using perspective in drawing; later in reference to crystals. The physiological sense relating to muscular action is from 1889, from German isometrisch in this sense (1882).

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fire-drill (n.)

1865, originally a device for making fire by the twirled stick method, from fire (n.) + drill (n.1). Meaning "rehearsal of what to do in a fire" is from 1884 (originally it also involved fighting the fire), from drill (n.) in the "agreed-upon procedure" sense (see drill (v.)).

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homograph (n.)

1810 as a method of signalling, from homo- (1) "same" + -graph "something written." Meaning "a word of identical spelling with another, but of different origin and meaning," is from 1873. Related: Homographic; homography. Greek homographos meant "of the same letters."

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