Etymology
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congratulate (v.)

"address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure," 1540s, from Latin congratulatus, past participle of congratulari "wish joy," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Related: Congratulated; congratulating; congratulable.

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concinnity (n.)

"state of being well put-together, skillful and harmonious fitting together of parts," 1530s, from Latin concinnitas, from past-participle stem of concinnare "to make ready, make into," from concinnus "set in order, neat," from assimilated form of com "with" (see con-) + second element of uncertain origin. Related: Concinnate; concinnous.

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confabulation (n.)

"a talking together, chatting, familiar talk," mid-15c., from Late Latin confabulationem (nominative confabulatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin confabulari "to converse together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fabulari "to talk, chat," from fabula "a tale" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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consummate (adj.)

c. 1500, "complete, perfect, carried to the utmost extent or degree," from Latin consummatus "perfected, complete," past participle of consummare "sum up, complete," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + summa "sum, total," from summus "highest" (see sum (n.)). Of persons, "accomplished, very qualified," from 1640s. Related: Consummately.

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condole (v.)

1580s, "to sorrow or grieve over with another," from Late Latin condolere "to suffer with another," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + dolere "to grieve" (see doleful). Meaning "express condolences, speak sympathetically to one in pain, grief, or misfortune" is recorded from 1650s. Related: Condoled; condoling.

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consubstantial (adj.)

"having the same substance or essence," late 14c., a term in the theology of the Trinity, from Church Latin consubstantialis "of like essence, nature, or substance," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). In general use from 1570s. Related: Consubstantially; consubstantiality; consubstantialism.

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concavity (n.)

c. 1400, "a concave surface," from Old French concavit "hollow, concavity" (14c.) or directly from Latin concavitatem (nominative concavitas), from Latin concavus "hollow, arched, vaulted, curved," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole"). From 1570s as "state of being concave."

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concur (v.)

early 15c., "collide, clash in hostility," from Latin concurrere "to run together, assemble hurriedly; clash, fight," in transferred use, "to happen at the same time," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + currere "to run" (from PIE root *kers- "to run"). Sense of "to coincide, happen at the same time" is 1590s; that of "to agree in opinion" is 1580s in English.

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constrictive (adj.)

"tending to constrict or compress," c. 1400, from Late Latin constrictivus "drawing together, contracting," from Latin constrict-, past-participle stem of constringere "to bind together, tie tightly, fetter, shackle, chain," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stringere "to draw tight" (see strain (v.)).

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convivial (adj.)

1660s, "pertaining to or of the nature of a feast," from Late Latin convivialis "pertaining to a feast," from Latin convivium "a feast," from convivere "to carouse together, live together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Meaning "sociable" is from 18c. Related: Convivially; conviviality.

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