Etymology
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miniscule 

a common misspelling of minuscule attested from late 19c.

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unctious (adj.)
common variant of unctuous c. 1600-1725.
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wassup (interj.)
slang form of common greeting what's up?, popular 2000.
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c/o 
addressing abbreviation for care of; common by 1889.
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divulge (v.)

mid-15c., divulgen, "make public, send or scatter abroad" (now obsolete in this general sense), from Latin divulgare "publish, make common," from assimilated form of dis- "apart" (see dis-) + vulgare "make common property," from vulgus "common people" (see vulgar). Sense of "to tell or make known something formerly private or secret" is from c. 1600. Related: Divulged; divulging.

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badder (adj.)
obsolete or colloquial comparative of bad (adj.), common 14c.-18c.
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Piers 
common Old French form of masc. proper name Peter (q.v.).
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street-walker (n.)
"common prostitute," 1590s, from street (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.).
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sea-mew (n.)

"the common sea gull," early 15c., from sea + mew (n.1).

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crawfish (n.)

common name of small, long-tailed freshwater crustaceans, 1620s, a variant of crayfish (q.v.) common in the U.S., but not originally an American form. Also in 19c. American English as a verb, "to back out," in reference to the creature's movements.

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