Etymology
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miscarry (v.)

c. 1300, "go astray;" mid-14c., "come to harm; come to naught, perish;" of persons, "to die," of objects, "to be lost or destroyed," from mis- (1) "wrongly" + caryen "to carry" (see carry (v.)). Meaning "deliver an unviable fetus" is recorded from 1520s (compare abortion); that of "fail to reach the intended result, come to naught" (of plans or designs) is from c. 1600. Related: Miscarried; miscarrying.

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comeback (n.)

also come-back, 1889 as "verbal retort," from the verbal phrase; see come + back (adv.). Meaning "recovery, return to former position or condition after retirement or loss" is attested from 1908, American English.

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incubate (v.)
1640s (transitive), "to brood upon, watch jealously" (figurative); 1721 in literal sense "to sit on (eggs) to hatch them," from Latin incubatus, past participle of incubare "to lie in or upon," also in the figurative sense "brood" (see incubation). Intransitive sense "to sit upon eggs" is from 1755. Related: Incubated; incubating.
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revenue (n.)

early 15c., "income from property or possessions," from Old French revenue "a return," noun use of fem. past participle of revenir "come back" (10c.), from Latin revenire "return, come back," from re- "back" (see re-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

The meaning "public income, annual income of a government or state" is recorded from 1680s; revenue sharing was popularized from 1971, the Nixon Administration's policy of returning power to state and local governments by steering federal taxpayer money to them. Revenuer "U.S. Department of Revenue agent," the bane of Appalachian moonshiners, is attested by 1880.

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strong (adv.)
Old English strange "strongly, violently, severely, furiously" (alongside strongly), from the same source as strong (adj.). Going strong (1898) is from racing. To come on strong was originally come it strong (1812).
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venue (n.)
c. 1300, "a coming for the purpose of attack," from Old French venue "coming" (12c.), from fem. past participle of venir "to come," from Latin venire "to come," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." The sense of "place where a case in law is tried" is first recorded 1530s. Extended to locality in general, especially "site of a concert or sporting event" (1857). Change of venue is from Blackstone (1768).
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advent (n.)

"important arrival," 1742, an extended sense of Advent "season preceding Christmas" (in reference to the "coming" of Christ), which was in late Old English, from Latin adventus "a coming, approach, arrival," in Church Latin "the coming of the Savior," from past participle of advenire "arrive at, come to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Related: Adventual.

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invention (n.)
Origin and meaning of invention

early 15c., invencioun, "finding or discovering of something," from Old French invencion (13c.) and directly from Latin inventionem (nominative inventio) "faculty of invention," noun of action from past-participle stem of invenire "to come upon, find; find out; invent, discover, devise; ascertain; acquire, get, earn," from in- "in, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

The sense of "thing invented" is first recorded 1510s; that of "act or process of finding out how to make or do" is from 1530s.

Invention is applied to the contrivance and production of something, often mechanical, that did not before exist, for the utilization of powers of nature long known or lately discovered by investigation. Discovery brings to light what existed before, but was not known. [Century Dictionary]

The earliest sense of the word in Middle English was "devised method of organization" (c. 1400), a sense now obsolete. The meaning "finding or discovery of something" is preserved in Invention of the Cross, Church festival (May 3) celebrating the reputed finding of the Cross of the Crucifixion by Helena, mother of Constantine, in 326 C.E. The related classical Latin word for "a device, contrivance" was inventum.

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stumble (v.)
c. 1300, "to trip or miss one's footing" (physically or morally), probably from a Scandinavian source (compare dialectal Norwegian stumla, Swedish stambla "to stumble"), probably from a variant of the Proto-Germanic base *stam-, source of Old English stamerian "to stammer," German stumm, Dutch stom "dumb, silent." Possibly influenced in form by stumpen "to stumble," but the -b- may be purely euphonious. Meaning "to come (upon) by chance" is attested from 1550s. Related: Stumbled; stumbling. Stumbling-block first recorded 1526 (Tindale), used in Romans xiv.13, where usually it translates Greek skandalon.
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cometh (v.)
obsolete or poetic 2nd and 3rd person singular of come, from Old English cymeð.
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