Etymology
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consolate (v.)

"to comfort, console," late 15c., from Latin consolatus, past participle of consolari "offer solace, encourage, comfort, cheer," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + solari "to comfort" (see solace (n.)). Obsolete, replaced by console (v.). Related: Consolated; consolating.

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commiseration (n.)

"sympathetic suffering of grief or sorrow for the afflictions or distress of another," 1580s, from French commisération, from Latin commiserationem (nominative commiseratio) "part of an oration intended to excite compassion," noun of action from past-participle stem of commiserari "to pity," from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-) + miserari "bewail, lament," from miser "wretched" (see miser).

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commiserate (v.)
Origin and meaning of commiserate

"feel sorrow, regret, or compassion for through sympathy," c. 1600, from Latin commiseratus, past participle of commiserari "to pity, bewail," from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-) + miserari "bewail, lament," from miser "wretched" (see miser). Related: Commiserated; commiserating; commiserable. An Old English loan-translation of commiserari was efensargian.

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complicity (n.)

"the state of being an accomplice, partnership in wrongdoing or an objectionable act," 1650s, from French complicité, from Old French complice "accomplice, comrade, companion" (14c.), from Late Latin complicem, accusative of complex "partner, confederate," from Latin complicare "to fold together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Compare accomplice.

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complacence (n.)

mid-15c., "pleasure, gratification," especially "self-satisfaction, delight in one's condition" (c. 1500), from Medieval Latin complacentia "satisfaction, pleasure," from Latin complacentem (nominative complacens), present participle of complacere "to be very pleasing," from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + placere "to please" (see please (v.)). The sense of "disposition to please" (1620s) now goes with complaisance.

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comestible (n.)

1837, "article of food," from French comestible (14c.), from Late Latin comestibilis, from Latin comestus, past participle of comedere "eat up, consume," from com "with, together," here "thoroughly" (see com-) + edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). It was attested earlier as an adjective meaning "fit to eat" but this seems to have fallen from use 17c., and the word was reintroduced from French as a noun.

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complete (adj.)

late 14c., "having no deficiency, wanting no part or element; perfect in kind or quality; finished, ended, concluded," from Old French complet "full," or directly from Latin completus, past participle of complere "to fill up, complete the number of (a legion, etc.)," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

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comparison (n.)

mid-14c., "equal, match, resemblance, similarity," from Old French comparaison "comparison" (12c.), from Latin comparationem (nominative comparatio), noun of action from past participle stem of comparare "make equal with, liken, bring together for a contest," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)).

From late 14c. as "act of putting two things together and regarding them as equal," also "act of comparing."

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contort (v.)

"to twist or wrench out of shape," early 15c. (implied in contorted), from Latin contortus, past participle of contorquere "to whirl, twist together," from assimilated form of com- "with, together," here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-) + torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Related: Contorting.

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colligate (v.)

"to bind or fasten together," 1540s, from Latin colligatus, past participle of colligare "to bind together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). As a concept in logic, from 1837; in linguistics, from 1953. Related: Colligation.

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