Etymology
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exclude (v.)

"to shut out, debar from admission or participation, prevent from entering or sharing," mid-14c., from Latin excludere "keep out, shut out, hinder," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Excluded; excluding.

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suborder (n.)

also sub-order, 1807 in biology; 1834 in architecture, from sub- + order (n.). Related: Subordinal.

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fug (n.)

"thick, close, stuffy atmosphere," 1888. "orig dial. & School slang" [OED].

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ordinal (adj.)

c. 1400, "regular, ordinary; well-regulated, proper," from Old French ordinel and directly from Late Latin ordinalis "showing order, denoting an order of succession," from Latin ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, series" (see order (n.)). Meaning "marking the place or position of an object in an order or series" is from 1590s.

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closeness (n.)

mid-15c., "confined condition," from close (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "stuffiness" (of air) is from 1590s; meaning "nearness" is from 1716.

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shutter (v.)

"close with or as with a shutter," 1826, from shutter (n.). Related: Shuttered; shuttering.

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bustier (n.)

"women's close-fitting strapless top," 1979, from French bustier, from buste "bust" (see bust (n.1)).

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bereavement (n.)

"grievous loss," especially the death of a friend or close relation, 1731, from bereave + -ment.

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syntactic (adj.)

1771, from Modern Latin syntacticus, from Greek syntaktikos "a joining together, a joining in order," from syntassein "put in order" (see syntax).

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zip (v.2)

"to close or fasten by means of a zipper," 1932, back-formation from zipper (n.). Related: Zipped; zipping; zipless.

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