Etymology
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preclusive (adj.)

"tending to preclude," 1690s, from stem of Latin praecludere "to close, shut off; impede" (see preclude) + -ive. Related: Preclusively.

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shutter (v.)

"close with or as with a shutter," 1826, from shutter (n.). Related: Shuttered; shuttering.

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fug (n.)
"thick, close, stuffy atmosphere," 1888. "orig dial. & School slang" [OED].
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approximate (v.)
early 15c., "to bring or put close," from Late Latin approximatus, past participle of approximare "to come near to," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + proximare "come near," from proximus "nearest," superlative of prope "near" (see propinquity). Intransitive meaning "to come close" is from 1789. Related: Approximated; approximating.
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approximation (n.)

early 15c., approximacioun, "act of coming near or close," noun of action from approximate (v.). The meaning "result of approximating" is from 1650s.

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scan (n.)

1706, "a close investigation, an act of scanning," from scan (v.). The meaning "image obtained by scanning" is from 1953.

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pantyhose (n.)

 "sheer tights or close-fitting legwear covering the body from the waist to the toes," 1963, also pantihose; see panties + hose (n.).

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bereavement (n.)
"grievous loss," especially the death of a friend or close relation, 1731, from bereave + -ment.
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shave (n.)

c. 1600, "something shaved off;" from shave (v.); The Middle English noun shave (Old English sceafa) meant "tool for shaving." The meaning "operation of shaving the beard" is from 1838. The meaning "motion so close to something as to almost touch it" is by 1834. The figurative phrase close shave "exceedingly narrow miss or escape" is from 1856, on the notion of a slight, grazing touch.

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wink (v.)
Old English wincian "to blink, wink, close one's eyes quickly," from Proto-Germanic *wink- (source also of Dutch winken, Old High German winkan "move sideways, stagger; nod," German winken "to wave, wink"), a gradational variant of the root of Old High German wankon "to stagger, totter," Old Norse vakka "to stray, hover," from PIE root *weng- "to bend, curve." The meaning "close an eye as a hint or signal" is first recorded c. 1100; that of "close one's eyes (to fault or irregularity)" first attested late 15c. Related: Winked; winking.
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