Etymology
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acropolis (n.)

"elevated part of a Greek city," often the site of original settlement and usually a citadel, 1660s, from Latinized form of Greek akropolis "citadel" (especially, with capital A-, that of Athens), from akros "highest, upper" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + polis "city" (see polis). The plural would be acropoles.

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argosy (n.)

1570s, "large merchant vessel carrying rich freight," from Italian (nave) Ragusea "(vessel) of Ragusa," maritime city on the Dalmatian coast of the Adriatic (modern Dubrovnik in Croatia). Their large merchant ships brought rich Eastern goods to 16c. England. The city name sometimes was Aragouse or Arragosa in 16c. English. Figurative use from 1620s.

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Glasgow 

city in Scotland, from Gaelic, literally "green hollow," from glas "green, verdant" + cau "hollow."

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midtown (n.)

"the middle or central part of a town or city," by 1930, from mid (adj.) + town.

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megalopolis (n.)

"a metropolis; a very large, heavily populated urban complex," 1832, from Greek megas (genitive megalou) "great" (see mickle) + polis "city" (see polis). The word was used in classical times as an epithet of great cities (Athens, Syracuse, Alexandria), and it also was the name of a former city in Arcadia. Related: Megalopolitan.

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angora (n.)

type of wool, 1810, from Angora, city in central Turkey (ancient Ancyra, modern Ankara), which gave its name to the goat (1745 in English), and to its silk-like wool, and to a cat whose fur resembles it (1771 in English). The city name is from the Greek word for "anchor, bend" (see angle (n.)).

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Kyoto 

city in Japan, from kyo + to, both meaning "capital." Founded 794 as Heionkyo "Capital of Calm and Peace," it also has been known as Miyako and Saikyo. Kyoto Protocol so called because it was initially adopted Dec. 11, 1997, in the Japanese city.

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Zurich 

city and lake in Switzerland, German Zürich, said to be ultimately from Celtic root *dur- "water."

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Verona 

city in northern Italy, Celtic Vernomago, from verno "elder tree" + mago "field, place." Related: Veronese.

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Bruges 

city in modern Belgium, from plural of Flemish brug "bridge," from the Proto-Germanic source of English bridge (n.).

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