Etymology
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interurban (adj.)
1883, from inter- "between" + Latin urbs "city" (see urban (adj.)).
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Palmyra 

city of ancient Syria, from Greek Palmyra. Related: Palmyrene.

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Detroit 

city in Michigan, U.S., from French détroit, literally "straits," from Old French destreit (12c.), from Latin districtum, neuter of districtus (see district (n.)). A French fort was built there 1701. By 1918 the city name was synonymous with "U.S. automobile manufacturing."

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faience (n.)
fine kind of pottery or earthenware, 1714, from French faïence (16c.), probably from Fayence, French form of Faenza, city in Italy that was a noted ceramics center 16c. The city name is Latin faventia, literally "silence, meditation," perhaps a reference to a tranquil location.
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Tampa 
city in Florida, U.S.A., probably from the name of a Calusa village, of unknown origin.
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fifth column (n.)
1936, from Gen. Emilio Mola's comment at the siege of Madrid during the Spanish Civil War that he would take the city with his four columns of troops outside it and his "fifth column" (quinta columna) in the city.
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Braganza 
city in Portugal (Portuguese Bragança), from Celtic briga "height"
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Metroliner (n.)
U.S. high-speed inter-city train, 1969, from metropolitan + liner.
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Brest 
city in France, a Celtic name, from bre "hill." The city in modern Belarus is from Slavic berest "elm." It was part of Lithuania from 1319 and thus was known, for purposes of distinguishing them, as Brest Litovsk until 1921.
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Lhasa 
capital of Tibet, Tibetan, literally "city of the gods," from lha "god" + sa "city." The Lhasa apso type of dog is so called from 1935 in English, from Tibetan, literally "Lhasa terrier." Earlier name in English was Lhasa terrier (1894).
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