Etymology
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abjection (n.)
Origin and meaning of abjection

c. 1400, "humbleness, low state, meanness of spirit, abject situation, groveling humility," from Old French abjection (14c.), from Latin abiectionem (nominative abiectio) "dejection, despondency," literally "a throwing away, a casting off," noun of action from past-participle stem of abicere "to throw away, cast off; degrade, humble, lower," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + iacere "to throw" (past participle iactus; from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel").

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interjacent (adj.)

1590s, from Latin interiacentem (nominative interiacens) "lying between," present participle of interiacere "to lie between," from inter "among, between" (see inter-) + iacere "to throw; to set, establish" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Interjacency.

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upchuck (v.)

"to vomit," 1936, American English slang, from up (adv.) + chuck (v.) "to throw."

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cannon-shot (n.)

"distance a cannon will throw a ball," 1570s, from cannon (n.) + shot (n.).

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jet (v.1)

1690s, "to sprout or spurt forth, shoot out," from French jeter "to throw, thrust," from Late Latin iectare (abstracted from deiectare, proiectare, etc.), in place of Latin iactare "to toss about," frequentative of iacere "to throw, cast," from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel."

Middle English had a verb getten, jetten meaning "to prance, strut, swagger, be showy" (c. 1400), from getter, jetter, the Old French form of the verb. Related: Jetted; jetting.

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interjection (n.)

early 15c., interjeccioun, "an interjected or exclamatory word," from Old French interjeccion (13c.) and directly from Latin interiectionem (nominative interiectio) "a throwing or placing between," also in grammar and rhetoric, noun of action from past-participle stem of intericere "to throw between, set between," from inter "between" (see inter-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Interjectional.

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hyperbole (n.)

"obvious exaggeration in rhetoric," early 15c., from Latin hyperbole, from Greek hyperbole "exaggeration, extravagance," literally "a throwing beyond," from hyper- "beyond" (see hyper-) + bole "a throwing, a casting, the stroke of a missile, bolt, beam," from bol-, nominative stem of ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach"). Rhetorical sense is found in Aristotle and Isocrates. Greek had a verb, hyperballein, "to throw over or beyond."

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throwaway (adj.)

also throw-away, 1901 in reference to very low prices; by 1903 in reference to printed material meant to be read once then tossed, and to wasted votes; with reference to disposable consumer goods, attested from 1969. From the verbal phrase, attested from late 14c. in the sense "reject, cast from oneself," from throw (v.) + away (adv.). More literal meaning of "dispose of as useless, release from one's possession as unneeded" is first recorded 1520s. Throw-away society attested from 1967.

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jete (n.)

ballet step, 1830, from French (pas) jeté, from past participle of jeter "to throw" (see jet (v.1)).

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dismount (v.)

1540s, "to remove or throw down cannons from their mountings," from dis- + mount (v.). Meaning "get off from a horse or other ridden animal" is from 1580s; transitive sense of "throw or bring down from a horse" is from 1610s. Meaning "remove (a gem, picture, etc.) from a frame, setting, or other mount" is by 1879. Related: Dismounted; dismounting.

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