Etymology
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furtive (adj.)

16c., from French furtif (16c.), from Latin furtivus "stolen," hence also "hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery; a stolen thing," from fur (genitive furis) "a thief, extortioner," also a general term of abuse, "rascal, rogue," probably from PIE *bhor-, from root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." Related: Furtiveness.

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debase (v.)

1560s, "lower in position, rank, or dignity, impair morally," from de- "down" + base (adj.) "low," on analogy of abase (or, alternatively, from obsolete verb base "to abuse"). From 1590s as "lower in quality or value" (of currency, etc.), "degrade, adulterate." Related: Debased; debasing; debasement.

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groom (v.)

"tend or care for; curry and feed," 1809, from groom (n.1) in its secondary sense of "male servant who attends to horses." Transferred sense of "to tidy (oneself) up" is from 1843; figurative sense of "to prepare a candidate" is from 1887, originally in U.S. politics; meaning "train to accept sexual abuse" by 1989. Related: Groomed; grooming.

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congressman (n.)

1780, in reference to members of U.S. Congress, and it first appears in a piece of abuse (written by a Loyalist):

Ye coxcomb Congressmen, declaimers keen,
Brisk puppets of the Philadelphia scene ...

Technically of members of both the Senate and the House of Representatives, but typically meaning only the House members. Congresswoman attested from 1918 (Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) was the first).

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beastly (adj.)

c. 1200, "brutish, sensual, debased;" late 14c., "in the manner of a beast," from beast + -ly (1). Weakened in British upper crust use to "awfully, exceedingly" by mid-19c. Beastly drunk is from 1794.

Beastly expresses that which is altogether unworthy of a man, especially that which is filthy and disgusting in conduct or manner of life. Bestial is applied chiefly to that which is carnal, sensual, lascivious: as, bestial vices or appetites. [Century Dictionary]
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shinplaster (n.)

also shin-plaster, piece of paper soaked in vinegar, etc. and used by the poor as a home remedy to treat sores on the legs, the thing itself attested by 1771; from shin (n.) + plaster (n.). In U.S. history, it became a jocular phrase or slang term of abuse for devalued low-denomination paper currency (by 1817).

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bash (v.)
"to strike violently," 1640s, perhaps of Scandinavian origin, from Old Norse *basca "to strike" (cognate with or otherwise related to Swedish basa "to baste, whip, flog, lash," Danish baske "to beat, strike, cudgel"); or the whole group might be independently derived and echoic. Figurative sense of "abuse verbally or in writing" is from 1948. Related: Bashed; bashing.
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sodomite (n.)
late 14c., from Old French Sodomite "inhabitant of Sodom; sodomite," also a general term of abuse, or directly from Late Latin Sodomita, from Greek Sodomites "inhabitant of Sodom" (see Sodom, also sodomy). Related: Sodomitical. Old English had adjective sodomitisc. The King James Bible (1611) has fem. form sodomitesse in a marginal note to "whore" in Deuteronomy xxiii.17.
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so-so (adv.)
mid-15c., "moderately well," 1520s, "indifferently, neither too poorly nor too well," from so (adv.), which is attested from mid-13c. in the sense "in this state or condition." As an adjective, "mediocre, neither too good nor too bad," 1540s. So-and-so is from 1596 meaning "something unspecified;" first recorded 1897 as a euphemistic term of abuse. In 17c.-18c. So, so also could be colloquially a mere introductory phrase.
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baffle (v.)

1540s, "to disgrace," of uncertain origin. Perhaps a Scottish respelling of bauchle "to disgrace publicly" (especially a perjured knight), which is probably related to French bafouer "to abuse, hoodwink" (16c.), possibly from baf, a natural sound of disgust, like bah (compare German baff machen "to flabbergast"). The original sense is obsolete. The meaning "defeat someone's efforts, frustrate by interposing obstacles or difficulties" is from 1670s. Related: Baffled; baffling.

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