Etymology
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ombre (n.)

card game originating in Spain and popular late 17c. and early 18c., 1650s, from French hombre, ombre (17c.), or directly from Spanish hombre, literally "man" (see hombre). So called from an expression (translatable as "I am the man") spoken in the course of the game. Played usually by three persons with a pack of 40 cards (the 8s, 9s, and 10s being discarded), it was supersedes as the fashionable game by quadrille.

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postcard (n.)

1870, "a stamped blank card provided by postal authorities for writing and mailing short messages at a less rate of postage than that charged for letters," from post (n.3) + card (n.1). By 1894 it was being used in reference to private, blank, or unofficial cards, unstamped, of the same size, often with a picture on one side.

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ruff (n.2)

in card-playing, "act of trumping when a player has no cards of the suit led," by 1856, from ruff (v.) "trump when unable to follow suit" (1760), from the name of the old game of ruff (1580s), from French roffle, earlier romfle (early 15c.), from Italian ronfa, which is perhaps a corruption of trionfo "triumph" (from French; compare trump (n.1)). The old game, a predecessor of whist, was in vogue c. 1590-1630. 

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lotto (n.)
1778 as the name of a bingo-like game of chance, from French loto and directly from Italian lotto "a lot," from or with Old French lot "lot, share, reward, prize" a borrowing from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old English and Old Frisian hlot; see lot (n.)). In reference to the drawing of numbers to match those on the cards. Meaning "a lottery, a game of chance" is attested from 1827.
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muggins (n.)

"fool, simpleton," 1855, of unknown origin, apparently from the surname and perhaps influenced by slang mug "dupe, fool" (1851; see mug (n.2)). It also was the name of simple card game (1855) and the word each player tried to call out before the other in the game when two cards matched. The name turns up frequently in humor magazines, "comic almanacks," etc. in 1840s and 1850s.

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pass (n.2)

"written permission to pass into, or through, a place," 1590s, from pass (v.). Sense of "ticket for a free ride or admission" is by 1838. In cards, "the act of declining to make a bid," by 1923 in bridge. Colloquial make a pass "offer an amorous advance" is recorded by 1928, perhaps from a sporting sense (football, fencing). Phrase come to pass "be carried out or accomplished" (late 15c.) uses the word with a sense of "completion, accomplishment."

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vie (v.)
1560s, "to bet, make a bet," (literally "make a vie, the noun attested from 1530s in cards), especially in card-playing, "to wager the value of one's hand against an opponent's," shortened form of Middle English envie "make a challenge," from Old French envier "compete (against), provoke; invite, summon, subpoena;" in gambling, "put down a stake, up the bet;" from Latin invitare "to invite," also "to summon, challenge" (see invitation). Sense of "to contend (with) in rivalry" in English is from 1560s; that of "to contend, compete, strive for superiority" is from c. 1600.
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casino (n.)

1744, "public room for music or dancing," from Italian casino, literally "a little house," diminutive of casa "house," from Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin," which is of uncertain origin. The card game (also cassino) is attested by that name from 1792. Specifically as "building for aristocratic gambling" by 1820, first in an Italian context.

[T]he term Casino [is] indiscriminately applied to a set of farm offices, a country-seat, a gambling house, and a game of cards ... [Jane Waldie Watts, "Sketches Descriptive of Italy in the Years 1816 and 1817," London 1820]
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cinque (n.)

"a group of five, five units treated as one," especially at cards or dice, late 14c., from French cinq, a dissimilation from Latin quinque "five," in Late Latin also cinque (from PIE root *penkwe- "five").

The Cinque Ports (late 12c. in Anglo-Latin, late 13c. in English) were Hastings, Sandwich, Dover, Romney, and Hythe, granted special privileges from the crown in return for defense of the Channel in the days before England had a navy. Cinque outposts (1640s) was an old term for the five senses.

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comic (n.)

1580s, "a comedic writer;" 1610s, "a comedic actor or singer," from comic (adj.). The Latin adjective comicus also meant "a comedic poet, writer of comedies." Meaning "an entertainer who tells jokes, etc." is by 1952.

Comics for comedic illustrations in cards, newspapers, etc. is from 1890. Comic strip first attested 1914; comic book "a publication that consists of comic art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes" [Wikipedia] is from 1941 (the phrase was used from the 1880s to denote humorous books, some of which consisted entirely of captioned illustrations).

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