Etymology
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mete (v.)

"to allot," Old English metan (West Saxon mæton), "to measure, ascertain the dimension or quantity of; measure out; compare; estimate the greatness of value of" (class V strong verb; past tense mæt, past participle meten), from Proto-Germanic *metana "to measure" (source also of Old Saxon metan, Old Frisian, Old Norse meta, Dutch meten, Old High German mezzan, German messen, Gothic mitan "to measure"), from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Meaning "distribute or apportion by measure" is from c. 1300 and is the surviving sense, used now exclusively with out. Related: Meted; meting.

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papal (adj.)

"of a pope, relating to a pope in his official capacity," late 14c., from Old French papal (late 14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin papalis "pertaining to the pope," from papa (see pope).

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-meter 
word-forming element meaning "device or instrument for measuring;" commonly -ometer, occasionally -imeter; from French -mètre, from Greek metron "a measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."
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leadership (n.)
1821, "position of a leader, command," from leader + -ship. Sense extended by late 19c. to "characteristics necessary to be a leader, capacity to lead."
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metrical (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to versification, characterized by poetic measure or rhythm," from Latin metricus "metrical," from Greek metrikos "of or for meter, metrical," from metron "poetic meter" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Old English had meterlic in this sense. Meaning "pertaining to measure or the use of weights and measures" is from 1640s. Related: Metrically.

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-metry 

word-forming element meaning "process of measuring," Middle English -metrie, from French -metrie, from Latin -metria, from Greek -metria "a measuring of," from -metros "measurer of," from metron "measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

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symmetry (n.)

1560s, "relation of parts, proportion," from French symmétrie (16c.) and directly from Latin symmetria, from Greek symmetria "agreement in dimensions, due proportion, arrangement," from symmetros "having a common measure, even, proportionate," from assimilated form of syn- "together" (see syn-) + metron "measure" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Meaning "harmonic arrangement of parts" first recorded 1590s.

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trimeter (n.)
"a verse of three metrical feet," 1560s, from Latin trimetrus, from Greek trimetros "having three measures," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + metron "a measure" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Related: Trimetrical.
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farad (n.)
unit of electric capacity, suggested 1861, first used 1868, named for English physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867). Related: Faradic.
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gill (n.2)

liquid measure (in modern use commonly a quarter of a pint), late 13c., from Old French gille, a wine measure, and from Medieval Latin gillo "earthenware jar," words of uncertain origin, perhaps related to the source of gallon.

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